Dec 15, 2019

Bolivia to issue arrest warrant against Evo Morales

Bolivia's former President Evo Morales speaks during a November event honoring him in Mexico City. Photo: Hector Vivas/Getty Images

Bolivia's former President Evo Morales will be accused of sedition in an arrest warrant authorities are preparing to issue against him within days, interim leader Jeanine Áñez told reporters, per Reuters.

The big picture: Morales is in Argentina, where he was granted refugee status this week, the New York Times reports. He spent last month in Mexico, which granted him asylum following his resignation amid protests against his disputed October election win.

Go deeper: South America's uprisings are about more than politics

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Trump administration will deport Mexican asylum-seekers to Guatemala

More than 1,000 Mexican migrants had been waiting for weeks, some for months, for a chance to file for asylum in the U.S. Photo: Paul Ratje/AFP via Getty Images

The U.S. will begin sending Mexican asylum-seekers to Guatemala to wait out their cases instead of allowing them to remain in the U.S., according to documents obtained by BuzzFeed News.

Why it matters: The Trump administration had previously implemented a "remain in Mexico" policy for asylum-seekers from Central America, but international law forbids asylum-seekers from being sent back to their home country due to concerns they may face prosecution. Mexicans account for more than half of the estimated 21,000 asylum seekers waiting along the U.S.-Mexico border.

Go deeperArrowJan 6, 2020

Mexicans make up half of asylum seekers at southern border

Photo: Paul Ratje/AFP/Getty Images

Mexicans account for more than half of the estimated 21,000 asylum seekers waiting along the U.S.-Mexico border, the Los Angeles Times reports.

Why it matters: The increase in Mexican asylum seekers poses a particular challenge to the Trump administration and its "Remain in Mexico" policy, which requires Central American refugee seekers to remain in Mexico while they await their hearings. It can't apply to Mexicans since international law bans sending people back to the country where they may face persecution.

Go deeperArrowDec 26, 2019

Reuters: Iranian officials say 1,500 protestors killed in government crackdown

Photo: MOHAMMED SAWAF/AFP via Getty Images

About 1,500 people have reportedly been killed in Iran's recent crackdown on protests, including at least 17 teenagers and about 400 women, according to Iranian government sources who spoke to Reuters.

Why it matters: The alleged death toll is higher than any other official estimates provided thus far. Amnesty International reported in November that 304 people had been killed "as authorities crushed protests using lethal force" in November, while U.S. Iran envoy Brian Hook said earlier this month that the Iranian government "could have murdered over 1,000 Iranian citizens."

Go deeperArrowDec 23, 2019