May 19, 2019

Trump's GOP challenger Weld: I'm the most pro-choice 2020 candidate

Former Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld. Photo: Paul Marotta/Getty Images

Former Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld (R) told a crowd in Exeter, New Hampshire, he’s "the most pro-choice person you’re ever going to meet," AP reports.

Driving the news: Many 2020 hopefuls have come out swinging in opposition of Missouri's and Alabama's strict new abortion laws, describing the bills as "dangerous and exceptionally cruel," per Axios' Rashaan Ayesh.

What he's saying President Trump’s only major GOP primary challenger said he was unsure whether he'd have a litmus test that a possible Supreme Court justice would have to vote to keep Roe v. Wade, but his standard would be "pretty close," according to AP.

"The way I look at it, it’s kind of a power issue. ... who wants a lot of big, fat, white guys who live in Washington 700 miles away making the decision about what’s going to happen about a family pregnancy where the family has basis for some views and maybe wants to terminate the pregnancy?"

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Bernie's historic Jewish fight

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Sen. Bernie Sanders would be the first Jewish nominee of a major American political party — but that history-making possibility is being overshadowed by his conflicts with America's Jewish leaders and Israel's leadership.

The big picture: That's partly because we're all focusing on the implications of Democrats nominating a self-described democratic socialist. It's also because a candidate's religion no longer seems to matter as much to voters or the media, making the potential milestone of a Jewish nominee more of a non-event.

Coronavirus "infodemic" threatens world's health institutions

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The spread of the novel coronavirus outbreak is being matched, or even outrun, by the spread on social media of both unintentional misinformation about it and vociferous campaigns of malicious disinformation, experts tell Axios.

Why it matters: The tide of bad information is undermining trust in governments, global health organizations, nonprofits and scientists — the very institutions that many believe are needed to organize a global response to what may be turning into a pandemic.

America's addiction treatment misses the mark

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Addiction treatment in the U.S. is critically necessary yet deeply flawed.

The big picture: Drug overdoses kill tens of thousands of Americans a year, but treatment is often inaccessible. The industry is also riddled with subpar care and, in some cases, fraud.

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