Former Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld. Photo: Paul Marotta/Getty Images

Former Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld (R) told a crowd in Exeter, New Hampshire, he’s "the most pro-choice person you’re ever going to meet," AP reports.

Driving the news: Many 2020 hopefuls have come out swinging in opposition of Missouri's and Alabama's strict new abortion laws, describing the bills as "dangerous and exceptionally cruel," per Axios' Rashaan Ayesh.

What he's saying President Trump’s only major GOP primary challenger said he was unsure whether he'd have a litmus test that a possible Supreme Court justice would have to vote to keep Roe v. Wade, but his standard would be "pretty close," according to AP.

"The way I look at it, it’s kind of a power issue. ... who wants a lot of big, fat, white guys who live in Washington 700 miles away making the decision about what’s going to happen about a family pregnancy where the family has basis for some views and maybe wants to terminate the pregnancy?"

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Updated 19 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Politics: Obama: Trump is "jealous of COVID's media coverage."
  2. Health: Mask mandates help control the rise in coronavirus hospitalizations. Hospitals face a crush.
  3. Business: Coronavirus testing is a windfall. Winter threat spurs new surge of startup activity.
  4. Media: Pandemic causes TV providers to lose the most subscribers ever.
  5. World: Putin mandates face masks.

The GOP's monstrous math problem

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Republicans, win or lose next week, face a big — and growing — math problem.

The state of play: They're relying almost exclusively on a shrinking demographic (white men), living in shrinking areas (small, rural towns), creating a reliance on people with shrinking incomes (white workers without college degrees) to survive.

Right-wing misinformation machine could gain steam post-election

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

With less than a week until the 2020 election, researchers have expressed concern that the information ecosystem today is ripe for an unprecedented level of exploitation by bad actors, particularly hyper-partisan media and personalities on the right.

Why it matters: The misinformation-powered right-wing media machine that fueled Donald Trump's 2016 victory grew stronger after that win, and it's set to increase its reach as a result of the upcoming election, whether Trump wins or loses.