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President-elect Joe Biden said at a press conference on Friday that he gave "serious consideration" to appointing Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders (I) as his labor secretary, but instead chose Boston Mayor Marty Walsh.

Why it matters: Biden said he and Sanders agreed a Vermont special election for Sanders' seat could put Democrats' majority in the Senate — which the party just gained with the two runoff races in Georgia — in jeopardy.

What they're saying: "I'm confident he could've done a fantastic job," Biden said. "I can think of no more passionate ally to working people."

  • "We also discussed how we would work together, travel the country together, helping Marty and meeting with working men and women who feel forgotten and left behind in this economy.
  • "We agreed that we would work closely on our shared agenda of increasing worker power and to protect the dignity of work for all working people."

Go deeper: Biden finalizes full slate of Cabinet secretaries

Go deeper

Young people want checks on Big Tech's power

Data: Generation Lab; Chart: Sara Wise/Axios

The next generation of college-educated Americans thinks social media companies have too much power and influence on politics and need more government regulation, according to a new survey by Generation Lab for Axios.

Why it matters: The findings follow an election dominated by rampant disinformation about voting fraud on social media; companies' fraught efforts to stifle purveyors of disinformation including former President Trump; and a deadly Jan. 6 insurrection over the election organized largely online.

Kaine, Collins' censure resolution seeks to bar Trump from holding office again

Sen. Tim Kaine (center) and Sen. Susan Collins (right). Photo: Andrew Harnik/Pool via Getty Images

Sens. Tim Kaine (D-Va.) and Susan Collins (R-Maine) are forging ahead with a draft proposal to censure former President Trump, and are considering introducing the resolution on the Senate floor next week.

Why it matters: Senators are looking for a way to condemn Trump on the record as it becomes increasingly unlikely Democrats will obtain the 17 Republican votes needed to gain a conviction, Axios Alayna Treene writes. "I think it’s important for the Senate's leadership to understand that there are alternatives," Kaine told CNN on Wednesday.

Stark reminder for America's corporate leaders

Rosalind "Roz" Brewer is about to become only the second Black woman to permanently lead a Fortune 500 company. She starts as Walgreens CEO on March 15.

Why it matters: It's a stark reminder of how far corporate America's top decision-makers have to go during an unprecedented push by politicians, employees and even a stock exchange to diversify their top ranks.