Stories by Steve LeVine

Report: Districts most affected by automation lean Republican

Man works on car in plant.
Mercedes plant in Vance, Alabama. Photo: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty

Job automation has become a key factor in economic anxiety in recent years. As 2020 campaigns begin, Republicans are far more likely than Democrats to live and work in regions with highly automatable jobs, according to a new analysis from Brookings.

Driving the news: Brookings' Mark Muro, Jacob Whiton and Robert Maxim find a correlation between susceptibility to automation and red congressional districts. In the 2018 midterms, they found that 46 of the 50 congressional districts most exposed to automation elected Republicans. Similarly, all 50 of the least-exposed districts are represented by Democrats.

A new age of epidemics

Illustration of a scientist's gloved hand holding a petri dish with the world made out of bacteria
Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

In the 1950s, 400–500 Americans died every year from measles and another 100 from chicken pox. In the last major outbreak of rubella — in 1964–'65 — some 11,000 pregnant American women lost their babies and 2,100 newborns died.

  • The 1960s vaccine revolution all but wiped out these diseases by 2000. But now they are back — in the U.S. and around the world.

The overwhelming majority of the world's busiest ports are in China

Shipping cargo.
Shanghai's Yangshan Port. Photo: Qian Cheng/VCG via Getty

If you needed any further evidence of where global business is going, take a look at cargo traffic in the world's ports:

By the numbers: 7 of the top-10 world's busiest ports are in China, led by Shanghai, according to 2016 data from the World Shipping Council (h/t World Economic Forum and Visual Capitalist).

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