Stories by Khorri Atkinson

Florida suit seeks bilingual ballots for Puerto Ricans affected by Hurricane Maria

A voter arrives at an Osceola County polling station in Kissimee, Florida
A voter arrives at an Osceola County polling station in Kissimee, Florida. Photo: Gregg Newton/AFP/Getty Images

Civil rights groups filed a federal lawsuit against Florida election officials on Thursday, demanding Spanish-language voting materials and translators be available for voters of Latino descent in 32 counties for this year’s midterm elections.

The details: The nonpartisan groups say they have been working with officials in the counties to provide language services to Puerto Ricans — tens of thousands of whom have moved to the state since Hurricane Maria ravaged the U.S. territory. They expressed concern that many of the U.S. citizens with limited English proficiency are being disenfranchised. There are more than 1 million Puerto Ricans living in the state, per the Pew Research Center.

Sessions vows to "vigorously" prosecute makers of 3D-printed guns

Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Photo: Toya Sarno Jordan/Getty Images
Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Photo: Toya Sarno Jordan/Getty Images

Attorney General Jeff Sessions on Thursday warned that the Justice Department will "vigorously enforce" the federal prohibition of producing undetectable 3D-printed firearms "to the fullest extent."

"We will not stand for the evasion, especially the flaunting, of current law and will take action to ensure that individuals who violate the law by making plastic firearms and rendering them undetectable, will be prosecuted to the fullest extent."
— Sessions said in a statement

Go deeper: Colorado baker's new lawsuit over transgender woman's cake

Jack Phillips, owner of 'Masterpiece Cakeshop' in Colorado outside the U.S. Supreme Court. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images
Jack Phillips, owner of 'Masterpiece Cakeshop' in Colorado outside the U.S. Supreme Court. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Colorado baker Jack Phillips, who won the Supreme Court’s recent Masterpiece Cakeshop case in June, alleged in a new challenge this week that the state discriminated against him over his refusal to make a blue and pink cake celebrating a woman's gender transition.

The big picture: Like the last case, Phillips claims that he cannot deploy his artistic talents to create a cake requested by a transgender woman because it violates his religious and moral convictions. The state has ruled against his decision, and this case will be a major test over whether businesses can invoke religious objections to deny services to LGBTQ people after the Supreme Court punted on giving a definite answer to that question in Phillips' last case.