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Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Former tech entrepreneur Andrew Yang announced on Tuesday night that he has dropped out of the 2020 presidential race.

The big picture: Yang, who's never held public office, centered his campaign on universal basic income, wherein he proposed giving all Americans over 18 years of age $1,000 every month.

The state of play: Consistent mid-range polling landed Yang a spot on all but one of the first debate stages — including as the only person of color in the December and February debates.

  • Yang announced his decision in multiple media interviews.
  • He had failed to qualify for the January debate. He asked the Democratic National Committee to commission more early state qualifying polls prior to the event, which the committee declined, per The Daily Beast.
  • He'd hoped more opportunities to qualify could boost diversity on the debate stage, the Beast notes.

Between the lines: Yang argued he was dismissed by the media as a legitimate candidate, despite his strong polling numbers. Following the November Democratic debate, he demanded MSNBC — the event host — apologize for his lack of talk time, as he was the lowest of all the candidates on stage.

  • He was repeatedly left off of graphics of candidates, prompting his supporters to launch a #YangMediaBlackout after an omission from CNN.
  • He gained a dedicated online following, dubbed the #YangGang, that backed him across platforms.

Go deeper: 2020 presidential election: Track the candidates

Go deeper

37 mins ago - World

World leaders react to "new dawn in America" under Biden administration

President Biden reacts delivers his inaugural address on the West Front of the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

World leaders have pledged to work with President Biden on issues including the COVID-19 pandemic and climate change, with many praising his move to begin the formal process for the U.S. to rejoin the Paris Climate Agreement.

The big picture: Several leaders noted the swift shift from former President Trump's "America First" policy to Biden's action to re-engage with the world and rebuild alliances.

Updated 4 hours ago - Politics & Policy

In photos: The Biden and Harris inauguration

President Biden and first lady Jill Biden watch a fireworks show on the National Mall from the Truman Balcony at the White House on Wednesday night. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Biden signed his first executive orders into law from the Oval Office on Wednesday evening after walking in a brief inaugural parade to the White House with First Lady Jill Biden and members of their family. He was inaugurated with Vice President Kamala Harris at the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday morning.

Why it matters: Many of Biden's day one actions immediately reverse key Trump administration policies, including rejoining the Paris Agreement and the World Health Organization, launching a racial equity initiative and reversing the Muslim travel ban.

Republicans pledge to set aside differences and work with Biden

President Biden speaks to Sen. Mitch McConnell after being sworn in at the West Front of the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday. Photo: Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty Images

Several Republicans praised President Biden's calls for unity during his inaugural address on Wednesday and pledged to work together for the benefit of the American people.

Why it matters: The Democrats only have a slim majority in the Senate and Biden will likely need to work with the GOP to pass his legislative agenda.