Apr 6, 2020 - Technology

More trouble piles on for Zoom amid coronavirus usage spike

Ina Fried, author of Login

Photo: Yuriko Nakao/Getty Image

Concerns continue to mount over video chat provider Zoom, with New York City's school district, the largest in the country with more than a million students, advising teachers not to use its software. Zoom was also forced to issue yet another apology, this time for routing some calls through China.

Why it matters: Zoom has seen a massive increase in adoption amid the coronavirus lockdowns, but it has also repeatedly been forced to apologize for security lapses and other problems.

  • In a blog post, Zoom CEO Eric Yuan said that in a rush to add capacity, the company sent some calls through China, in violation of its usual procedures. Zoom attempts to host most calls on servers in the region in which they operate, but sometimes uses a different region to ease spikes in demand. However, calls from outside China aren't supposed to be handled there.
  • The China issue was first uncovered by Toronto's Citizen Lab.

Go deeper: Zoom's tarnished moment of glory

Go deeper

Updated 29 mins ago - Politics & Policy

DOJ to treat antifa involvement in protests as domestic terrorism

Barr and Trump. Photo: Doug Mills-Pool/Getty Images

Attorney General Bill Barr said in a statement Sunday that the Justice Department will use its network of 56 regional FBI Joint Terrorism Task Forces to identify the "criminal organizers and instigators" of violence during the George Floyd protests, including antifa and similar groups.

Why it matters: Barr, President Trump and other members of the administration have pinned the blame for riots and looting over the past few days of protests against police brutality on antifa, a loosely defined far-left movement that uses violence and direct-action protest tactics.

Updated 54 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Journalists get caught in the crosshairs as protests unfold

A man waves a Black Lives Matter flag atop the CNN logo outside the CNN Center during a protest in response to the police killing of George Floyd, Atlanta, Georgia, May 29. Photo: Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

Dozens of journalists across the country tweeted videos Saturday night of themselves and their crews getting arrested, being shot at by police with rubber bullets, targeted with tear gas by authorities or assaulted by protesters.

Why it matters: The incidents show how easy it can be for journalists to become entangled in the stories they cover, especially during a time of civil unrest.

3 hours ago - Technology

Trump and Zuckerberg share phone call amid social media furor

Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

In the week that President Trump took on social media, Axios has learned that he had a call Friday with Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg that was described by both sides as productive.

Why it matters: With the White House and Twitter at war, Facebook has managed to keep diplomatic relations with the world's most powerful social-media devotee.