Apr 6, 2020 - Technology

More trouble piles on for Zoom amid coronavirus usage spike

Ina Fried, author of Login

Photo: Yuriko Nakao/Getty Image

Concerns continue to mount over video chat provider Zoom, with New York City's school district, the largest in the country with more than a million students, advising teachers not to use its software. Zoom was also forced to issue yet another apology, this time for routing some calls through China.

Why it matters: Zoom has seen a massive increase in adoption amid the coronavirus lockdowns, but it has also repeatedly been forced to apologize for security lapses and other problems.

  • In a blog post, Zoom CEO Eric Yuan said that in a rush to add capacity, the company sent some calls through China, in violation of its usual procedures. Zoom attempts to host most calls on servers in the region in which they operate, but sometimes uses a different region to ease spikes in demand. However, calls from outside China aren't supposed to be handled there.
  • The China issue was first uncovered by Toronto's Citizen Lab.

Go deeper: Zoom's tarnished moment of glory

Go deeper

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 8:30 p.m. ET: 5,919,364— Total deaths: 364,459 — Total recoveries — 2,490,221Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 8:30 p.m. ET: 1,745,606 — Total deaths: 102,798 — Total recoveries: 406,446 — Total tested: 16,099,515Map.
  3. Public health: Hydroxychloroquine prescription fills exploded in March —How the U.S. might distribute a vaccine.
  4. 2020: North Carolina asks RNC if convention will honor Trump's wish for no masks or social distancing.
  5. Business: Fed chair Powell says coronavirus is "great increaser" of income inequality.
  6. 1 sports thing: NCAA outlines plan to get athletes back to campus.

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Mark Zuckerberg at the 56th Munich Security Conference in Munich, Germany on February 15. Photo: Abdulhamid Hosbas/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Facebook did not remove President Trump's threat to send the National Guard to Minneapolis because the company's policy on inciting violence allows discussion on state use of force, CEO Mark Zuckerberg explained in a post on Friday.

The big picture: Zuckerberg's statement comes on the heels of leaked internal criticism from Facebook employees over how the company handled Trump's posts about the Minneapolis protests and his unsubstantiated claims on mail-in ballots — both of which Twitter has now taken action on.

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President Trump in the Rose Garden on May 29. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

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Driving the news: Former Vice President Joe Biden said via livestream a few hours earlier that he, too, had spoken with Floyd's family. The presumptive Democratic presidential nominee implored white Americans to consider systemic injustices against African Americans more broadly, Axios' Alexi McCammond reports.