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Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

YouTube announced Thursday that it is expanding its hate and harassment policies to prohibit content that targets an individual or group with conspiracy theories, like QAnon, that have been used to justify real-world violence.

Why it matters: It is the latest tech giant to crack down on QAnon content, which has seen record online interest in 2020.

Catch up quick: QAnon is a sprawling, far-right conspiracy theory that falsely alleges a secret cabal of sex traffickers and pedophiles is waging a war against President Trump from inside the government.

  • Trump has previously praised the movement, which the FBI has deemed a potential domestic terrorist threat, saying that he understands its supporters "like me very much" and that they "love America."

The state of play: YouTube said that the policy applies to content that threatens or harasses someone by suggesting they are complicit in harmful conspiracy theories, like QAnon or Pizzagate.

  • The tech giant added that news coverage on these issues or content discussing them that doesn't target individuals or protected groups — veterans, people with disabilities, etc. — may stay up.

Between the lines: YouTube also said that its efforts to refine its policies over the past two years have helped to curb QAnon-linked content.

  • It said the steps it introduced nearly two years ago to limit the reach of harmful misinformation have resulted in an 80% drop in views of QAnon content via its search and discovery systems.
  • The company noted it has removed tens of thousands of QAnon videos and hundreds of channels to date, focusing on those that explicitly threaten violence or "deny the existence of major violent events."

The big picture: Tech platforms have been caught flat-footed trying to manage the spread of conspiracy-linked content on their platforms because the content often does not violate existing hate speech or harassment policies.

  • In the wake of calls for violence around the election, Big Tech is trying to get ahead of the broader harm that conspiracy content can have on society.

Go deeper

Off the Rails

Episode 3: Descent into madness ... Trump: "Sometimes you need a little crazy"

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photos: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. This Axios series takes you inside the collapse of a president.

Episode 3: The conspiracy goes too far. Trump's outside lawyers plot to seize voting machines and spin theories about communists, spies and computer software.

President Trump was sitting in the Oval Office one day in late November when a call came in from lawyer Sidney Powell. "Ugh, Sidney," he told the staff in the room before he picked up. "She's getting a little crazy, isn't she? She's really gotta tone it down. No one believes this stuff. It's just too much."

17 mins ago - Podcasts

Podcast: After the Biden inaugural

Joe Biden was sworn in today as America's 46th president in an inauguration unlike any other in modern history.

Axios Re:Cap goes deeper into the speech, the atmosphere and what it all tells us about the incoming administration, with Axios political reporters Hans Nichols and Alexi McCammond.

Biden embarks on a consequential presidency

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Donald Trump tried everything to delegitimize the rival who vanquished him. In reality, he's set Joe Biden on course to be a far more consequential U.S. president than he might otherwise have become.

The big picture: President Biden now confronts not just a pandemic, but massive political divisions and an assault on truth — and the aftermath of the assault on the Capitol two weeks ago that threatened democracy itself.