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People participate in the Women's March as they protest President Trump in Washington, D.C., on Saturday. Photo: Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

The fourth annual Women's March on Washington, D.C., Saturday drew much smaller crowds than the millions who rallied in the capitol after President Trump's 2017 inauguration, but the crowd was just as passionate, NPR reports.

The big picture: Over 25,000 people signed up online to attend the D.C. march and more than 250 events were held around the U.S, per the New York Times. Here's what else unfolded, in photos.

§skewering President Trump featured prominently at rallies, including this one outside the New Hampshire State House in Concord. Photo: Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images
Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer greets at the march in Manhattan. Photo: Ira L. Black/Corbis via Getty Images
Demonstrators outside the Trump International Hotel New York. Photo: John Lamparski/Getty Images
Actors Frances Fisher (L) and Rosanna Arquette (R) greet California First Partner Jennifer Siebel Newsom onstage at the 4th Annual Women's March LA: Women Rising at Pershing Square in Los Angeles. Photo: Sarah Morris/Getty Images

Go deeper: Women's March on Washington expects historically low turnout

Go deeper

GOP plots payback for deplatforming Trump

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Capitol Hill conservatives are gaming out a multi-front war on the tech industry as retribution for deplatforming President Trump and others on the right, congressional sources tell Axios.

Why it matters: When you're in the minority, you figure out who you are as a party. With Republicans now looking up at the Democrats, they're searching for a unifying issue. This is one, at least for now.

Republicans ignore McCarthy and name-drop anyway

Rep. Liz Cheney speaks as House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy watches. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc via Getty Images

Members of the House Republican Conference ignored leader Kevin McCarthy last week when he warned them against criticizing colleagues by name based on intelligence that doing so could trigger more political violence.

Why it matters: McCarthy made clear that name-dropping opponents, instead of spelling out complaints in more general terms, can put a literal target on a politician, especially with tensions so high following the events of Jan. 6.

Updated 5 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Health: CDC director defends agency's response to pandemic — CDC warns highly transmissible coronavirus variant could become dominant in U.S. in March.
  2. Politics: Biden readies massive shifts in policy for his first days in office.
  3. Vaccine: Fauci: 100 million doses in 100 days is "absolutely" doable.
  4. Economy: Unemployment filings explode again.
  5. Tech: Kids' screen time sees a big increase.
  6. World: WHO team arrives in China to investigate pandemic origins.