Left to right: Rep. Beto O'Rourke of Texas, Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (D-N.D.) and Sen. Joe Manchin (D- W.V.) Photo: Tom Reel-Pool/Getty Images, Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call and Drew Angerer/Getty Images.

Republicans have secured the Senate majority after a series of GOP upsets in key states across the U.S., including in red states such as Indiana and North Dakota.

Between the lines: There are 10 Senate Democrats running for re-election in states that President Trump won. Their challenges explain why Republicans are already projected to keep control of the Senate.

Winning and losing red-state Senate Democrats

Winners
  • Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio)
  • Sen. Bob Casey (D-Pa.)
  • Sen. Joe Manchin (D- W.Va.)
  • Sen. Tammy Baldwin (D-Wis.)
  • Sen. Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.)
  • Sen. Jon Tester (D-Mont.)
Losers
  • Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.)
  • Former Gov. Phil Bredesen (D-Tenn.)
  • Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (D-N.D.)
  • Rep. Beto O'Rourke (D-Texas)
  • Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.)
Other Trump state Democrats
  • Sen. Bill Nelson (D-Fla.)

Go deeper: The Senate map is trouble for Democrats in 2018

Go deeper

BodyArmor takes aim at Gatorade's sports drink dominance

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

BodyArmor is making noise in the sports drink market, announcing seven new athlete partnerships last week, including Christian McCaffrey, Sabrina Ionescu and Ronald Acuña Jr.

Why it matters: It wants to market itself as a worthy challenger to the throne that Gatorade has occupied for nearly six decades.

S&P 500's historic rebound leaves investors divided on future

Data: Money.net; Chart: Axios Visuals

The S&P 500 nearly closed at an all-time high on Wednesday and remains poised to go from peak to trough to peak in less than half a year.

By the numbers: Since hitting its low on March 23, the S&P has risen about 50%, with more than 40 of its members doubling, according to Bloomberg. The $12 trillion dollars of share value that vanished in late March has almost completely returned.

Newsrooms abandoned as pandemic drags on

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Facing enormous financial pressure and uncertainty around reopenings, media companies are giving up on their years-long building leases for more permanent work-from-home structures. Others are letting employees work remotely for the foreseeable future.

Why it matters: Real estate is often the most expensive asset that media companies own. And for companies that don't own their space, it's often the biggest expense.