Photo by Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Mark Zuckerberg today broke his silence on the "Cambridge Analytica situation," but there were several issues that his post didn't address.

Bottom line: It took five days to come up with this?

1. Why Facebook didn't publicly disclose the misuse of data by Cambridge Analytics when it learned about it in 2015. Nor why it didn't subsequently reveal it in the midst of several controversies related to the election of Donald Trump, including "fake news," whose campaign was known to have contracted with Cambridge Analytics.

2. Why Facebook's PR machine last Friday night opted to front-run exposés by both The Guardian and NY Times.

3. Whether he'll answer calls to testify on the matter in front of Congress, and his thoughts on the possibility of greater social media regulation.

4. An apology.

Thought bubble: If you're reading Zuckerberg's note and wondering why Facebook hadn't yet taken these seemingly basic steps, it's because the company is now begrudgingly curbing its core business function: collecting and providing access to data. It's not something it naturally wants to do.

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The big picture: Trump has baselessly claimed on a number of occasions that the only way he will lose the election is if it's "rigged," claiming — without evidence — that mail-in ballots will result in widespread fraud. Earlier on Wednesday, the president said he wants to quickly confirm a replacement for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg because he believes the Supreme Court may have to decide the result of the election.

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Dave Lawler, author of World
Updated 1 hour ago - World

U.S. no longer recognizes Lukashenko as legitimate president of Belarus

Lukashenko at his secret inauguration. Photo: Andrei Stasevich/BELTA/AFP via Getty Images

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Why it matters: Lukashenko has clung to power with the support of Russia amid seven weeks of protests that have followed a blatantly rigged election. Fresh protests broke out Wednesday evening in Minsk after it emerged that Lukashenko had held a secret inauguration ceremony.

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