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Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Mark Zuckerberg weighed in on what he called the "Cambridge Analytica situation" today in a Facebook post, saying there was a "a breach of trust between Facebook and the people who share their data with us and expect us to protect it. We need to fix that."

Why it matters: Facebook has been under extraordinary pressure from lawmakers, regulators and Wall Street to respond to the issue.

"We have a responsibility to protect your data, and if we can't then we don't deserve to serve you. I've been working to understand exactly what happened and how to make sure this doesn't happen again. The good news is that the most important actions to prevent this from happening again today we have already taken years ago. But we also made mistakes, there's more to do, and we need to step up and do it."
— Zuckerberg

Facebook also announced concrete actions in a separate post. It will:

  1. Notify users if it knows an app has been misusing data. "Moving forward, if we remove an app for misusing data, we will tell everyone who used it."
  2. Turn off access for unused apps. "If someone hasn’t used an app within the last three months, we will turn off the app’s access to their information."
  3. Limit the amount of data given to those that use Facebook Login, its authentication platform
  4. Go back and review pre-2014 apps that, like the one at the center of this scandal, had access to wide swaths of data including information not just by those using the apps, but also their friends. "We will conduct a full audit of any app with suspicious activity. If we find developers that misused personally identifiable information, we will ban them from our platform."

But there is a ton that wasn't said in either post, including his response to criticisms over how long Facebook took to disclose what it knew in this case as well as the many calls for new regulations and for company executives to testify.

Sandberg too: Also breaking her silence was Sheryl Sandberg, who shared Zuckerberg's post and adding "You deserve to have your information protected - and we'll keep working to make sure you feel safe on Facebook. Your trust is at the core of our service. We know that and we will work to earn it."

Initial reactions: Shares of Facebook inched up after the post, though many on Twitter noted how modest the specific changes being are. Meanwhile, Sen. Ed Markey replied to Zuckerberg, saying "You need to come to Congress and testify to this under oath."

But, but, but: What Zuckerberg didn't say in his note.

What's next: Zuckerberg is set to appear on CNN tonight.

Go deeper

28 U.S. citizens depart Afghanistan on Qatar Airways flight

Passengers board a Qatar Airways aircraft bound to Qatar at the airport in Kabul on September 10, 2021. Photo: Aamir Qureshi/AFP via Getty Images

The State Department on Saturday confirmed that a Qatar Airways charter flight left Kabul on Friday with 28 U.S. citizens and seven lawful permanent residents on board.

The big picture: Friday's flight is the third such airlift by Qatar Airways since the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan, AP reports.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Smaller than expected "Justice for J6" rally met with large police presence

Police officers watch as demonstrators gather for the "Justice for J6" rally in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 18, 2021. Photo: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

A few hundred demonstrators were met by a heavy law enforcement presence on Saturday at the "Justice for J6" rally outside the fenced-off U.S. Capitol, AP reports.

The latest: Four people were arrested at the rally, including one person with a gun, one with a knife and two with outstanding warrants, per the U.S. Capitol Police.

DHS to increase deportation flights to Haiti from Del Rio

Migrants walk across the Rio Grande River carrying supplies back to a makeshift encampment under the international bridge between Del Rio, Texas, and Acuña, Mexico. Officials are struggling to provide food, water, shelter and sanitation, forcing migrants to cross the Rio Grande several times per day for basic necessities. Photo: Jordan Vonderhaar via Getty Images

The Department of Homeland Security on Saturday announced plans to ramp up deportation flights to Haiti out of the small Texas border town Del Rio, starting as soon as Sunday.

Why it matters: Reports have emerged of more than 10,000 migrants, primarily from Haiti, crowded in a temporary camp under the international bridge in Del Rio. Hoping to find refuge in the United States, they've had to bear with filthy conditions and the scorching sun for days, per an NBC News affiliate.