Jun 25, 2019

Wayfair employees to walk out over bed sales to migrant child detention centers

Photo Illustration: Rafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Employees from the furniture company Wayfair are set to walk out Wednesday in response to the company's unwillingness to stop selling beds to the operators of migrant child detention centers.

The big picture: According to the Wayfair Walkout Twitter account, at least 547 employees have signed a petition asking executives to stop selling beds to the facilities after discovering an over $200,000 order was placed for a Texas facility. The employees are asking that all profits made from the transactions be donated to The Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education and Legal Services.

According to the Boston Globe, the company responded with the following statement:

"As business leaders, we also believe in the importance of respecting diversity of thought within our organization and across our customer base. No matter how strongly any one of us feels about an issue, it is important to keep in mind that not all employees or customers agree."

What's next: The walkout is scheduled for 1:30pm tomorrow.

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Why it matters: Current and former leaders of the U.S. military are drawing a line over Trump's demand for a militarized response to the protests and unrest that have swept the country over the killing of George Floyd by police.

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Photo: Avalon/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)

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Why it matters: The shift comes after Times employees began a coordinated movement on social media on Wednesday and Thursday that argued that publishing the op-ed put black staff in danger. Cotton wrote that Trump should invoke the Insurrection Act in order to deploy the U.S. military against rioters that have overwhelmed police forces in cities across the country.

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Thousands of protesters march over the Brooklyn Bridge on June 4 in New York City. Photo: Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

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The latest: Civil rights groups filed a lawsuit Thursday against President Trump, Attorney General Bill Barr and other federal officials on behalf of Black Lives Matter and other peaceful protesters who were forcibly removed with rubber bullets and chemical irritants before Trump's photo-op at the historic St. John’s Episcopal Church on Monday.