Feb 26, 2020 - Health

Walmart to expand its low-cost health care centers

Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Walmart is looking to expand its role in health care delivery, Bloomberg reports.

Details: Walmart stores already frequently house pharmacies and vision centers, but its new health centers — there are two so far — would offer more comprehensive medical, vision and dental care, along with X-rays and lab tests.

  • Unlike traditional clinics, which are usually staffed by nurse practitioners, the health centers are run by doctors, and patients are seen in exam rooms.
  • Patients are told what their care will cost before they get it, and those prices are often half of what Walmart has estimated they cost elsewhere.

The big picture: If it's successful, the move sets Walmart up to compete against companies like Walgreens and CVS, which have moved into clinics, and could give patients in rural communities more access to care.

Go deeper: Walmart fumbles in the battle for wealthy shoppers

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Walmart tests rival to Amazon Prime

Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Walmart plans to start publicly testing its new membership program called Walmart+ next month in hopes of competing with Amazon Prime, Recode's Jason Del Rey scoops.

Why it matters: The paid membership program "would include perks that Amazon can’t replicate, in part to avoid a direct comparison to Prime."

Democratic health care debate topics finally expand past Medicare for All

Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

Democrats finally debated health care subjects other than Medicare for All on Tuesday night.

Why it matters: We have a much wider range of health care problems than political debates usually suggest. Discussing rural Americans' lack of access to health care may not be as exciting as debating whether to do away with private insurance, but it's a subject that many voters struggle with every day.

Go deeperArrowFeb 26, 2020 - Health

Why Amazon's bigger Go grocery stores matter

An Amazon Go store in Seattle. Photo: David Ryder/Getty Images

With the opening of its first large-format cashier-less grocery store in Seattle on Tuesday, Amazon is on its way to further expanding its physical footprint across U.S. cities.

The big picture: Amazon’s 2017 purchase of Whole Foods was never the end of its grocery ambitions — or its fight to win a bigger share of the whopping $700 billion per year American grocery industry. With its own network of stores, Amazon could attract shoppers looking for cheaper prices than Whole Foods and dramatically grow its brick-and-mortar reach.