The LeDroit Park post office in Washington, D.C. on May 28. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

The House Oversight Committee has asked Postmaster General Louis DeJoy, appointed by President Trump in May, to testify on Sept. 17 on changes made to the U.S. Postal Service under the Trump administration.

Why it matters: USPS mail has seen days of backlogs and delays after DeJoy, a former fundraiser for Trump and the Republican National Committee, enacted new cost-cutting procedures that took effect in mid-July, the Washington Post reports.

The big picture: Voting rights groups have said that USPS delays could be a "recipe for disaster" as many states push for mail-in voting as the safest option for November's election, according to the New York Times.

  • Trump has railed against the reliability of mail-in voting and claimed, without evidence, that the election will be rigged if widespread mail-in ballots are allowed.

What they're saying: "While these changes in a normal year would be drastic, in a presidential election year when many states are relying heavily on absentee mail-in ballots, increases in mail delivery timing would impair the ability of ballots to be received and counted in a timely manner—an unacceptable outcome for a free and fair election,” the committee wrote to DeJoy in a letter on July 20.

Go deeper

How the Supreme Court could decide the election

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Supreme Court isn't just one of the most pressing issues in the presidential race — the justices may also have to decide parts of the election itself.

Why it matters: Important election-related lawsuits are already making their way to the court. And close results in swing states, with disputes over absentee ballots, set up the potential for another Bush v. Gore scenario, election experts say.

Sep 27, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Meadows criticizes Wray but says Trump has confidence in FBI chief: "He's still there"

White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows continued his criticism of FBI Director Christopher Wray on Sunday, but he said President Trump still has confidence in him as of this moment.

What's he's saying: "The minute that the president loses confidence in any of his Cabinet members — they serve at his pleasure — he will certainly look at replacing them," Meadows told CBS' "Face the Nation" on Sunday.

The top Republicans who aren't voting for Trump in 2020

Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Former Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Ridge announced in an op-ed Sunday that he would be voting for Joe Biden.

Why it matters: Ridge, who was also the first secretary of homeland security under George W. Bush, joins other prominent Republicans who have publicly said they will either not vote for Trump's re-election this November or will back Biden.

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