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Photo: Su Weizhong/VCG via Getty Images

The Trump administration put in place restrictions on U.S. technology exports to China's biggest chipmaker, Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corp., the WSJ reported Saturday.

Why it matters: The curbs are the latest restrictions issued by the Trump administration to limit China's efforts to compete in advanced technology, per WSJ.

Details: According to a Commerce Department letter, reviewed by the WSJ and other media outlets, U.S. companies will need licenses to export goods to SMIC due to an "unacceptable risk" that the products may be used for Chinese military purposes.

  • The letter, sent to U.S. firms on Friday, added that the controls will be in place “pending the U.S. government’s review of SMIC and its subsidiaries," per the Washington Post.

The other side: A SMIC spokeswoman cited by WSJ said in an emailed statement that the company continues "to engage constructively and openly" with the U.S. Department of Commerce.

  • “SMIC reiterates that it manufactures semiconductors and provides services solely for civilian and commercial end-users and end-uses. The Company has no relationship with the Chinese military and does not manufacture for any military end-users or end-uses,” the spokeswoman added.

Go deeper: Chipmaker secures largest Chinese IPO in nearly a decade

Go deeper

Dec 22, 2020 - World

U.S. charges against Zoom executive highlight tech's China problem

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Last week, the U.S. Department of Justice charged a China-based Zoom executive with disrupting video meetings hosted by users outside China that commemorated the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre. The complaint reveals the now-terminated employee was sending the private data of some U.S.-based users directly to the Ministry of State Security (MSS), China's main civilian spy agency.

Why it matters: Researchers and U.S. government officials have warned that the Chinese government might require China-based employees of U.S. companies to hand over private company data to Beijing. The DOJ's charges indicate those fears are valid.

Dec 21, 2020 - World

U.S. warns Chinese investments in Israeli tech industry could pose security threat

Netanyahu meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping in 2017. Photo: Xinhua/Rao Ainmin via Getty Images

The Trump administration is concerned Chinese investments in the Israeli tech industry could harm Israeli and U.S. national security, assistant secretary of state for Near East Affairs David Schenker said Monday at a conference organized by the SIGNAL think tank, which focuses on Israeli-Chinese academic cooperation.

Why it matters: The Trump administration has previously raised concerns in private about Chinese involvement in Israel’s booming tech sector. This is likely the first time the administration has done so in public.

51 mins ago - World

Putin foe Navalny to be detained for 30 days after returning to Moscow

Russian opposition leader Alexey Navalny. Photo: Oleg Nikishin/Epsilon/Getty Images

Russian opposition leader Alexey Navalny has been ordered to remain in pre-trial detention for 30 days, following his arrest upon returning to Russia on Sunday for the first time since a failed assassination attempt last year.

Why it matters: The detention of Navalny, an anti-corruption activist and the most prominent domestic critic of Russian President Vladimir Putin, has already set off a chorus of condemnations from leaders in Europe and the U.S.