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Data: Indeed; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

The number of unemployed Americans vastly outnumbers the number of open jobs in every single state.

Why it matters: Even though we've come back from the worst unemployment numbers, the pandemic's economic toll keeps turning furloughs into job losses — and pushing millions of people out of the workforce entirely.

By the numbers: In every state, job postings are way down compared with 2019 levels, according to data from Indeed's Hiring Lab that was provided to Axios.

  • In several states with job-magnet cities — like New York, California, Illinois and Massachusetts — postings are down close to 30%. "This is more a big-city recession than a rural one," says Jed Kolko, Indeed's chief economist.
  • Some places, like West Virginia, Mississippi and Alabama, recovered but have started to dip again.
  • The outliers: The outlook in Hawaii and D.C., both of which rely on domestic and international tourism, is especially bleak, with job posts down 46% and 40%, respectively.

The big picture: With the pandemic affecting every city and every industry, job seekers have nowhere to turn.

  • "Historically, the U.S. has relied on mobility to solve these problems," says Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody's Analytics. "The problem with the pandemic is that it has hit every single community in the country. There's nowhere to go."
  • Hiring slumps have been concentrated in industries like hospitality and retail, which have been directly hit by the coronavirus crisis. But the effects are bleeding into other sectors like tech and finance as the pandemic and the recession push companies to reevaluate their hiring plans.

The bottom line: "We're gonna have a lot fewer jobs for a long time," Zandi says. "We'll get back, but it won't be next year or the year after. It'll likely be mid-decade."

Go deeper

Felix Salmon, author of Capital
Sep 17, 2020 - Economy & Business

America's cities are facing an immigration deficit

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

America's cities are facing a historic shortage of two vital resources: money and immigrants.

Why it matters: Cities drive American economic growth, and immigrants drive cities. The coronavirus pandemic has effectively stanched the main source of talent that municipal economies have long relied upon.

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Where key GOP senators stand on replacing Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell talks to reporters on Capitol Hill last Thursday. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

With President Trump planning to nominate his third Supreme Court justice nominee this week, key Republican senators are indicating their stance on replacing the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg with less than 50 days until Election Day.

The state of play: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (Ky.) has vowed that "Trump’s nominee will receive a vote on the floor of the United States Senate." Two GOP senators — Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) and Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) — have said they oppose holding a vote before the election, meaning that two more defections would force McConnell to delay until at least the lame-duck session of Congress.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 4 p.m. ET: 30,873,714 — Total deaths: 958,383— Total recoveries: 21,103,559Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 4 p.m. ET: 6,788,343 — Total deaths: 199,421 — Total recoveries: 2,577,446 — Total tests: 94,211,463Map.
  3. Politics: Testing czar on Trump's CDC contradictions: "Everybody is right" Ex-FDA chief: Career scientists won't be "easily cowed" by political vaccine pressure
  4. Education: What we overlooked in the switch to remote learning
  5. Health: The dwindling chances of eliminating COVID-19.
  6. World: England sets £10,000 fine for breaking self-isolation rules — The countries painting their pandemic recoveries green.