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Data: Indeed; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

The number of unemployed Americans vastly outnumbers the number of open jobs in every single state.

Why it matters: Even though we've come back from the worst unemployment numbers, the pandemic's economic toll keeps turning furloughs into job losses — and pushing millions of people out of the workforce entirely.

By the numbers: In every state, job postings are way down compared with 2019 levels, according to data from Indeed's Hiring Lab that was provided to Axios.

  • In several states with job-magnet cities — like New York, California, Illinois and Massachusetts — postings are down close to 30%. "This is more a big-city recession than a rural one," says Jed Kolko, Indeed's chief economist.
  • Some places, like West Virginia, Mississippi and Alabama, recovered but have started to dip again.
  • The outliers: The outlook in Hawaii and D.C., both of which rely on domestic and international tourism, is especially bleak, with job posts down 46% and 40%, respectively.

The big picture: With the pandemic affecting every city and every industry, job seekers have nowhere to turn.

  • "Historically, the U.S. has relied on mobility to solve these problems," says Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody's Analytics. "The problem with the pandemic is that it has hit every single community in the country. There's nowhere to go."
  • Hiring slumps have been concentrated in industries like hospitality and retail, which have been directly hit by the coronavirus crisis. But the effects are bleeding into other sectors like tech and finance as the pandemic and the recession push companies to reevaluate their hiring plans.

The bottom line: "We're gonna have a lot fewer jobs for a long time," Zandi says. "We'll get back, but it won't be next year or the year after. It'll likely be mid-decade."

Go deeper

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
Oct 21, 2020 - Economy & Business

Why the stimulus delay isn't a crisis (yet)

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

If the impasse between House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and the White House on a new stimulus deal is supposed to be a crisis, you wouldn't know it from the stock market, where prices continue to rise.

  • That's been in no small part because U.S. economic data has held up remarkably well in recent months thanks to the $2 trillion CARES Act and Americans' unusual ability to save during the crisis.

Amy Coney Barrett's immediate impact

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

In her first week on the job, Amy Coney Barrett may be deciding which votes to count in the presidential election. By her third week, she’ll be deciding the fate of the Affordable Care Act.

Where it stands: The Senate votes on Barrett’s nomination tomorrow. If she’s confirmed, Chief Justice John Roberts is expected to swear her in at the Supreme Court within hours, an administration official tells Axios.

Texas Democrats beg Biden to spend now

Photo: Ron Jenkins/Getty Images

The Biden campaign is rebuffing persistent pleas from Texas Democrats to spend at least $10 million in the Lone Star state, several people familiar with the talks tell Axios.

Why it matters: If Texas — which has 38 electoral votes and is steadily getting more blue, but hasn't backed a Democrat for president since 1976 — flipped to the Biden column, it would be game over. But the RealClearPolitics polling average stubbornly hovers at +2.6 for Trump — and Team Biden appears more focused on closer targets.