Apr 15, 2019

Uber's IPO shows it views mass transit as a competitor

Ben Geman, author of Generate

Jalopnik's Aaron Gordon noticed something important in Uber's big IPO filing that underscores how ride-hailing can cannibalize mass-transit.

What they found: "While the filing does mention the company’s efforts to offer riders 'multi-modal trips' that may include public transportation should they choose, the vast majority of the filing’s mentions of public transit make plainly clear the company sees buses and trains as a competing service," Gordon writes.

  • "Far from being a partner in helping people move around cities, Uber regularly slots public transportation as 'competition' or an obstacle to the company’s 'growth strategy,'" the piece adds.

Why it matters: As we wrote about Friday, some analysts fear that the growth of Uber and similar services will stymie efforts to wring carbon out of transportation and lead to more congestion.

Our thought bubble, per Axios' Kia Kokalitcheva: It’s no surprise that multiple ride-hailing companies, including Uber and Lyft, were born in San Francisco — it’s a proven market where the local public transit doesn’t meet the needs of some residents.

  • Though it recently shut down, the Ford-acquired Chariot commuter bus service was a prime example as it provided a more comfortable alternative to popular bus routes for commuters willing to pay a bit more or who weren’t served by the city’s subways.
  • Similarly, Uber and Lyft’s carpooling options have also become popular among commuters, Kia adds.

Go deeper: How on-demand transportation could make public transit more efficient

Go deeper

Updated 17 mins ago - Politics & Policy

In photos: Protesters and police clash nationwide over George Floyd

A firework explodes behind a line of police officers next to the Colorado State Capitol during a protest over the death of George Floyd in Denver on May 30. Photo : Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images

Police used tear gas, rubber bullets and pepper spray as the protests sparked by the killing of George Floyd continued nationwide into early Sunday.

The big picture: Police responded over the weekend with force, in cities ranging from Salt Lake City to Atlanta to Des Moines, Houston to Detroit, Milwaukee to Washington, D.C., Denver and Louisville. Large crowds gathered in Minneapolis on Saturday for the fifth day in a row.

Updated 57 mins ago - Politics & Policy

George Floyd protests: What you need to know

Photo: David Dee Delgado/Getty Images

Clashes erupted between police and protesters in several major U.S. cities Saturday night as demonstrations over the death of George Floyd and other police-related killings of black men spread across the country.

The big picture: Floyd's death in Minneapolis police custody is the latest reminder of the disparities between black and white communities in the U.S. and comes as African Americans grapple with higher death rates from the coronavirus and higher unemployment from trying to stem its spread.

Massive demonstrations put police response to unrest in the spotlight

Washington State Police use tear gas to disperse a crowd in Seattle during a demonstration protesting the death of George Floyd. Photo: Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images

The response of some officers during demonstrations against police brutality in the U.S. has been criticized for being excessive by some officials and Black Lives Matter leaders.

Why it matters: The situation is tense across the U.S., with reports of protesters looting and burning buildings. While some police have responded with restraint and by monitoring the protests, others have used batons, tear gas, rubber bullets and other devices to disperse protesters and, in some cases, journalists.