Screenshot: Axios

Twitter said Monday that it has suspended an account named "ANTIFA_US" which it says was tied to the white nationalist group Identity Evropa. Over the weekend, the account had called for violence and its posts had widely circulated online.

Why it matters: It's the latest example of social media being used to exploit and sharpen the very real divisions in American society. It's also the latest example of Twitter more aggressively rooting out false information on its platform.

"This account violated our platform manipulation and spam policy, specifically the creation of fake accounts," a Twitter representative told Axios. "We took action after the account sent a Tweet inciting violence and broke the Twitter Rules."

  • Twitter has previously taken action on other fake accounts linked to the Identity Evropa group, including ones engaged in targeted hate focused on race, religion and sexual orientation.

Context: As protests about the death of George Floyd spread nationwide over the past week, President Trump and his allies began charging, without evidence, that antifa — a label for a variety of far-left anti-fascist groups and activists — were responsible for the unrest.

The big picture: Twitter has become more active in holding to account those promoting violence on its platform.

  • Last week, the service flagged a tweet from President Trump for violating the company's rules against glorifying violence.
  • On Monday, it did the same with a separate tweet from U.S. Rep. Matt Gaetz.
  • President Trump, in response to his tweet being labeled, issued an executive order that aims to limit the protections afforded to social media.

Facebook, by contrast, has refused to label or remove any of Trump's posts, sparking a significant amount of dissent internally. That culminated in an employee walkout Monday, during whch a reported several hundred Facebook employees stepped away from their desks and posted messages calling on the company to take action.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Scoop: Twitter removes photo from Trump tweet after NYT copyright complaint

Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

Twitter has removed a picture from a tweet by President Trump on Tuesday after it received a Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) complaint from the New York Times, which owns the rights to the photo.

Why it matters: This is the second time in two weeks that Twitter has had to take down content from Trump's account due to a copyright violation.

Trump administration notifies Congress of intent to withdraw from WHO

Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Sen. Bob Menendez (D-N.J.), the top Democrat on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, said on Twitter Tuesday that the Trump administration has informed Congress that the United States is officially beginning the process of withdrawing from the World Health Organization.

Why it matters: President Trump's decision to formally withdraw from the UN's global health agency — which will take effect on July 6, 2021 — comes as the pandemic continues to accelerate both in the U.S. and around the world.

Updated 42 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Mary Trump book: How she leaked Trump financials to NYT

Simon & Schuster

In her new memoir, President Trump's niece reveals how she leaked hordes of confidential Trump family financial documents to the New York Times in an effort to expose her uncle, whom she portrays as a dangerous sociopath.

Why it matters: Trump was furious when he found out recently that Mary Trump, a trained psychologist, would be publishing a tell-all memoir. And Trump's younger brother, Robert, tried and failed to block the publication of "Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World's Most Dangerous Man."