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Photo: Twitter

Twitter plans to less prominently feature potentially abusive comments, a move it says shows promise in helping combat the impact of "trolls" on its site.

Why it matters: While social networks are under fire for a variety of issues, Twitter has been particularly criticized for its lack of ability to keep abusive posts off its site despite repeated promises to improve.

The company plans to use a range of factors in deciding how prominently (or not) to include particular tweets in search results and reply mentions.

The new approach weighs factors such as whether an account has verified itself with an e-mail address, whether a user often tweets at people who don't follow them and when a person has signed up for multiple accounts at the same time.

"In our early testing in markets around the world, we’ve already seen this new approach have a positive impact, resulting in a 4% drop in abuse reports from search and 8% fewer abuse reports from conversations," Twitter said in a blog post on Tuesday. "That means fewer people are seeing Tweets that disrupt their experience on Twitter."

Go deeper

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Woman who allegedly stole laptop from Pelosi's office faces fresh charges

Photo: FBI

A woman accused of breaching the Capitol and planning to sell to Russia a laptop or hard drive she allegedly stole from Speaker Nancy Pelosi's office faces fresh charges, according to a criminal complaint amended Tuesday.

Driving the news: Riley June Williams, 22, who was arrested in Pennsylvania's Middle District Monday, is suspected of being the woman featured in a video saying, "dude, put on gloves," before a man's gloved hand reaches for the laptop, per the Department of Justice.

Trump grants flurry of last-minute pardons

Photo: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty

President Trump issued 73 pardons and commuted the sentences of 70 individuals early Wednesday, 11 hours from leaving office.

Why it matters: It's a last-minute gift to some of the president's loyalists and an evident use of executive power with only hours left of his presidency. Axios reported in December that Trump planned to grant pardons to "every person who ever talked to me."

3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Trump revokes ethics order barring former aides from lobbying

Photo: Spencer Platt via Getty

Shortly after pardoning members of Congress and lobbyists convicted on corruption charges, President Trump revoked an executive order barring former officials from lobbying for five years after leaving his administration.

Why it matters: The order, which was signed eight days after he took office, was an attempt to fulfill his campaign promise to "drain the swamp."

  • But with less than 12 hours left in office, Trump has now removed those limitations on his own aides.