Photo: Twitter

Twitter plans to less prominently feature potentially abusive comments, a move it says shows promise in helping combat the impact of "trolls" on its site.

Why it matters: While social networks are under fire for a variety of issues, Twitter has been particularly criticized for its lack of ability to keep abusive posts off its site despite repeated promises to improve.

The company plans to use a range of factors in deciding how prominently (or not) to include particular tweets in search results and reply mentions.

The new approach weighs factors such as whether an account has verified itself with an e-mail address, whether a user often tweets at people who don't follow them and when a person has signed up for multiple accounts at the same time.

"In our early testing in markets around the world, we’ve already seen this new approach have a positive impact, resulting in a 4% drop in abuse reports from search and 8% fewer abuse reports from conversations," Twitter said in a blog post on Tuesday. "That means fewer people are seeing Tweets that disrupt their experience on Twitter."

Go deeper

Facebook auditors say it's failing on civil rights

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The findings from a new civil rights audit commissioned and released by Facebook show that the tech giant repeatedly failed to address issues of hatred, bigotry and manipulation on its platform.

Why it matters: The report comes as Facebook confronts a growing advertiser boycott and criticism for prioritizing freedom of speech over limiting misinformation and protecting users targeted by hate speech.

54 mins ago - Sports

Sports in the coronavirus era might need an asterisk

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

American sports leagues are back, and COVID-permitting, we're finally entering the period of uninterrupted sports bliss we've been anticipating for months.

The question: Given the unusual circumstances, it's worth considering how each season will be remembered years from now. So we pose the question: Do sports in 2020 need an asterisk?

What China's uneven recovery means for the U.S.

China and much of Southeast Asia look to be bouncing back strongly from the coronavirus pandemic as stock markets and much of the country's economic data are returning to pre-pandemic levels.

What's happening: "Our tracking points to a clear V-shaped recovery in China," economists at the Institute of International Finance said in a note to clients Tuesday, predicting the country's second-quarter growth will rise above 2% after its worst quarter on record in Q1.