Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Stay on top of the latest market trends

Subscribe to Axios Markets for the latest market trends and economic insights. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Sports news worthy of your time

Binge on the stats and stories that drive the sports world with Axios Sports. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tech news worthy of your time

Get our smart take on technology from the Valley and D.C. with Axios Login. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Get the inside stories

Get an insider's guide to the new White House with Axios Sneak Peek. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Denver news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Des Moines news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Twin Cities news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Tampa Bay news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Charlotte news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Photo: Omar Marques/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Twitter announced updates to its new political ad ban on Friday, clarifying how it will define political ads and what exceptions exist for certain advertisers.

Why it matters: The new details include bans on specific advertising micro-targeting, which is something that industry leaders and regulators have been calling for in light of research and reporting showing how micro-targeting can be abused to spur misinformation.

Background: Twitter said it would ban political ads last month. The announcement, which was made at the same time as Facebook's earnings call, didn't reveal many of the details around the policy at the time. The policy is expected to go into effect Nov. 22.

Details: Twitter explained Friday that it will limit advertising micro-targeting for all advertisers to location, keyword and interest targeting.

  • Keyword targeting focuses on a certain set of approved words, like "soccer," while interest-based targeting means targeting around a set of approved interests such as "cooking."
  • Keywords related to politics will not be permitted.

Between the lines: Twitter also clarified how it would define political ads and which kinds of accounts would be impacted by its new rules.

  • Twitter will not allow ads from candidates, political parties or elected or appointed government officials. In the U.S., PACs, SuperPACs and political nonprofits, called 501(c)(4)s, are also prohibited from running ads. The restriction expires when a politician is no longer in office or running for office.
  • The tech giant stated that it will define political ads as "content that references a candidate, political party, elected or appointed government official, election, referendum, ballot measure, legislation, regulation, directive, or judicial outcome."
  • Twitter clarified how it would define and regulate issue ads, saying ads that "educate, raise awareness, and/or call for people to take action in connection with civic engagement, economic growth, environmental stewardship, or social equity causes" will be prohibited.

If a for-profit wants to run ads that aim to raise awareness around a cause, they can but the ads can't have the primary goal of driving political, judicial, legislative or regulatory outcomes, per Twitter. It adds that those ads have to be tied to the organization's publicly stated values, principles and/or beliefs.

Twitter also said that news publishers will, to an extent, be exempt from this policy.

  • This is notable because Facebook received blowback for its political ad policy for news publishers when it first introduced guidelines in mid-2018.
  • According to Twitter, news publishers that meet its political ad exemption criteria can run ads that reference political content and/or prohibited advertisers, "but may not include advocacy for or against those topics or advertisers."

The big picture: Twitter reiterated on the call that the policy is a work in progress, and there will be times wherein mistakes are made in enforcing the new rules, but that overwhelmingly, it has received positive responses from its community.

"Most people understand what we’re trying to achieve and some people may disagree with the message but people are being open and waiting for details to come out."
— Vijaya Gadde, legal, policy and trust & safety lead at Twitter, on a call with reporters

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Neera Tanden withdraws nomination for Office of Management and Budget director

Neera Tanden testifying before the Senate Budget Committee in Washington, D.C., in February 2021. Photo: Anna Moneymaker/The New York Times/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Neera Tanden withdrew her name from nomination to lead the Office of Management and Budget after several senators voiced opposition and concern about her qualifications and past combative tweets, President Biden announced Tuesday.

Why it matters: Tanden’s decision to pull her nomination marks Biden's first setback in filling out his Cabinet with a thin Democratic majority in the Senate.

What's ahead for the newest female CEOs

Jane Fraser (L) and Rosalind Brewer. Photos: Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images; Rodrigo Capote/Bloomberg via Getty Images.

The number of women at the helm of America’s biggest companies pales in comparison to men, but is newly growing — and their tasks are huge.

What's going on: Jane Fraser took over at Citigroup this week, the first woman to ever lead a major U.S. bank. Rosalind Brewer will take the reins at Walgreens in the coming weeks (March 15) — a company that's been run by white men for more than a century.

3 hours ago - Health

Biden says U.S. will have enough vaccines for 300 million adults by end of May

President Biden. Photo: Anna Moneymaker-Pool/Getty Images

President Biden on Tuesday said that ramped-up coronavirus vaccine production will provide enough doses for 300 million Americans by the end May.

Why it matters: That's two months sooner than Biden's previous promise of enough vaccines for all American adults by the end of July.