Photo: Win McNamee / Getty Images

The White House released a statement Thursday coming out in full force against the bipartisan immigration bill drafted by Sens. Mike Rounds (R-SD) and Angus King (I-ME) stating that the amendment would "drastically change our national immigration policy for the worse by weakening border security and undercutting existing immigration law."

Our thought bubble, from Axios' Jonathan Swan: This is a big deal. Veto threats are rare at this stage of the legislative process. As I said in Sunday’s Sneak Peek, you should keep an eye on Sens. Tom Cotton and David Perdue. This is Trump emphasizing the extent to which the they represent his thinking on immigration, which is far more than Senate leadership or other more moderate senators. Trump is laying down a marker on immigration— and it’s a tough one. 

Bottom line: It’s hard to imagine a universe in which the bill Trump, Cotton and Perdue want gets 60 votes in the Senate. And it’s equally hard to imagine the Senate passing an immigration bill that will satisfy Trump or the more conservative Republicans in the House. 

Later, Trump also tweeted his criticism of the bipartisan bill:

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Microphones will be muted during parts of Thursday's presidential debate

Photos: Jim Watson and Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

The Commission on Presidential Debates adopted new rules on Monday to mute microphones to allow President Trump and Joe Biden two minutes of uninterrupted time per segment during Thursday night's debate, AP reports.

Why it matters: In the September debate, Trump interrupted Biden 71 times, compared with Biden's 22 interruptions of Trump.

Updated 49 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Politics: Trump says if Biden's elected, "he'll listen to the scientists"Trump calls Fauci a "disaster" on campaign call.
  2. Health: Coronavirus hospitalizations are on the rise — 8 states set single-day coronavirus case records last week.
  3. States: Wisconsin judge reimposes capacity limit on indoor venues.
  4. Media: Trump attacks CNN as "dumb b*stards" for continuing to cover pandemic.
  5. Business: Consumer confidence surveys show Americans are getting nervousHow China's economy bounced back from coronavirus.
  6. Sports: We've entered the era of limited fan attendance.
  7. Education: Why education technology can’t save remote learning.

Supreme Court denies Pennsylvania GOP request to limit mail-in voting

Protesters outside Supreme Court. Photo: Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images

The Supreme Court on Monday denied a request from Pennsylvania's Republican Party to shorten the deadlines for mail-in ballots in the state. Thanks to the court's 4-4 deadlock, ballots can be counted for several days after Election Day.

Why it matters: It's a major win for Democrats that could decide the fate of thousands of ballots in a crucial swing state that President Trump won in 2016. The court's decision may signal how it would deal with similar election-related litigation in other states.