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Twitter and Facebook on Monday added labels to posts from President Trump that baselessly claimed a state Supreme Court ruling on absentee ballots in Pennsylvania will "allow rampant and unchecked cheating" and "induce violence in the streets."

Why it matters: Twitter has taken a more direct stance in labeling political tweets as misinformation than some counterparts, like Facebook, ahead of the 2020 election.

Driving the news: The Supreme Court last week denied a bid from Pennsylvania Republicans to expedite their request to shorten the deadline for receiving mail-in ballots.

Of note: It's not the first time the tech giants have labeled one of the president's tweets.

  • The site last week labeled a post by Trump, in which he baselessly claimed "Big problems and discrepancies with Mail In Ballots." It also labeled another post earlier last month that baselessly claimed COVID-19 is less deadly "in most populations" than the flu.

What he's saying: The president tweeted and posted on Facebook "The Supreme Court decision on voting in Pennsylvania is a VERY dangerous one. It will allow rampant and unchecked cheating and will undermine our entire systems of laws. It will also induce violence in the streets. Something must be done!"

What they did: Twitter added a label to the tweet which reads, "Some or all of the content shared in this Tweet is disputed and might be misleading about an election or other civic process."

  • Facebook's label reads "Both voting by mail and voting in person have a long history of trustworthiness in the US. Voter fraud is extremely rare across voting methods."

For the record: Twitter restricted users from retweeting or interacting with the post. The same post has been shared thousands of times by users on Facebook, which did not restrict engagements.

Go deeper

Nov 30, 2020 - Technology

Facebook's pre-election restrictions didn't dent political ad reach

Photo: Valera Golovniov/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Americans saw more political ads on Facebook in the week before the 2020 election than they did the prior week despite the company's blackout on new political ads during that period, according to Global Witness, a human rights group that espouses tech regulation.

Why it matters: The presidential election was a key stress test for Facebook and other leading online platforms looking to prove that they can curb misinformation. Critics contend measures like the new-ad blackout barely made a dent.

Dec 1, 2020 - Technology

Facebook, Google push deals despite antitrust scrutiny

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Facebook announced Monday that it has purchased a customer service chatbot startup called Kustomer. The app reportedly cost Facebook $1 billion, the same amount it paid for Instagram in 2012.

Why it matters: The deal is the latest sign that the world's biggest tech companies, despite facing enormous antitrust scrutiny globally, will not stop buying up other companies.
.

Dec 1, 2020 - Technology

Facebook News to launch in U.K. in January

Photo: Chesnot/Getty Images

Facebook said Monday that it plans to launch Facebook News in the U.K. in January, with several big publishers, including Conde Nast, The Economist, Guardian Media Group, Hearst and others, initially providing content.

Why it matters: The creation of Facebook's dedicated News tab has helped the company appease regulator demands globally for more equitable relationships with news publishers.

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