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President Trump. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

The Trump administration will begin deterring immigrants from Kyrgyzstan, Myanmar, Eritrea, Nigeria, Sudan and Tanzania, the administration announced on Friday.

Why it matters: This comes three years after Trump's signature travel ban was first announced, which barred people from several Muslim-majority nations from entering the U.S. The move serves as another sign of the U.S. closing its doors to immigrants under the Trump administration.

Between the lines: The restrictions will not bar all travel for those coming to the U.S. from the 6 countries. People from Kyrgyzstan, Myanmar, Eritrea and Nigeria will be restricted from permanent immigration visas, which include some family and employer-sponsored visas, as well as the diversity visa lottery — a program designed to give green cards to people from nations who do not often immigrate to the U.S.

  • Foreigners from these countries would still be able to visit the U.S., according to a administration officials.
  • Sudanese nationals and Tanzanians will only be excluded from the diversity visa lottery.
  • The restrictions will go into effect on Feb. 22.

Iran, Syria, Libya, Venezuela, North Korea, Yemen and Somalia were impacted by the original travel ban, which was upheld by the Supreme Court last year.

The other side: "In the coming weeks, the House Judiciary Committee will mark-up and bring to the Floor the NO BAN Act to prohibit religious discrimination in our immigration system and limit the President’s ability to impose such biased and bigoted restrictions," House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Friday in a statement.

Go deeper: What's next: Trump's broader travel ban

Go deeper

The new Washington

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Axios subject-matter experts brief you on the incoming administration's plans and team.

Rep. Lou Correa tests positive for COVID-19

Lou Correa. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Rep. Lou Correa (D-Calif.) announced on Saturday that he has tested positive for the coronavirus.

Why it matters: Correa is the latest Democratic lawmaker to share his positive test results after last week's deadly Capitol riot. Correa did not shelter in the designated safe zone with his congressional colleagues during the siege, per a spokesperson, instead staying outside to help Capitol Police.

Far-right figure "Baked Alaska" arrested for involvement in Capitol siege

Photo: Shay Horse/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The FBI arrested far-right media figure Tim Gionet, known as "Baked Alaska," on Saturday for his involvement in last week's Capitol riot, according to a statement of facts filed in the U.S. District Court in the District of Columbia.

The state of play: Gionet was arrested in Houston on charges related to disorderly or disruptive conduct on the Capitol grounds or in any of the Capitol buildings with the intent to impede, disrupt, or disturb the orderly conduct of a session, per AP.