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Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

An order from President Trump that would ban TikTok in the U.S. is putting in jeopardy TikTok's plan to hire 10,000 U.S. employees, according to a source familiar with the company's thinking.

Why it matters: When TikTok first rolled out the job pledge, it served as a carrot in the political conflict over the social video service, but it's now being held out as a stick.

Between the lines: The company doesn't expect the move to affect current employees at this point, according to the source. TikTok employs about 1,500 people in the U.S., 1,000 of whom have joined in the past year.

  • The new jobs involve a mix of skills and locations across Texas, California, Florida, Tennessee and New York. Many of the jobs in Texas are slated to be sales-related, while Florida and Nashville, Tennessee were targeted as customer service hubs.

Meanwhile, the Wall Street Journal reported that TikTok was collecting user data using a technique banned by Google.

  • In a statement, TikTok said the current version of its app does not collect MAC address information, but the company did not respond to follow-up questions from Axios as to when and why it stopped collecting such information.

By the numbers: A new Harris Poll survey finds 57% of Americans support Trump’s executive order.

  • Nearly two-thirds of active TikTok users oppose the order, however.
  • Interestingly, more than 60% of both the overall sample and the active TikTok users said a sale to an American company wouldn't eliminate security concerns given TikTok's ties to China.

Go deeper: Earlier this week, I talked to CNBC about the challenges facing TikTok as it looks to find an American buyer for its U.S. operations.

Go deeper

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
Nov 6, 2020 - Economy & Business

Chinese short-video and live streaming app KuaiShou files for IPO

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

KuaiShou, a Chinese short-video and live streaming app, filed for a Hong Kong IPO that reportedly will seek to raise $5 billion.

Why it matters: This reflects the booming market for TikTok-style services in China, as KuaiShou claims to have over 300 million daily users. Its rivals include Douyin (ByteDance's Chinese version of TikTok) and Nasdaq-listed Bilibili (which, like KuaiShou, includes Tencent and Alibaba as shareholders).

Woman who allegedly stole laptop from Pelosi's office to sell to Russia is arrested

Photo: FBI

A woman accused of breaching the Capitol and planning to sell to Russia a laptop or hard drive she allegedly stole from Speaker Nancy Pelosi's office was arrested in Pennsylvania's Middle District Monday, the Department of Justice said.

Driving the news: Riley June Williams, 22, is charged with illegally entering the Capitol as well as violent entry and disorderly conduct. She has not been charged over the laptop allegation and the case remains under investigation, per the DOJ.

Biden will reverse Trump's attempt to lift COVID-related travel restrictions

Photo: Tasos Katopodis via Getty

The incoming Biden administration will reverse President Trump's last-minute order to lift COVID-19 related travel restrictions, Jen Psaki, the incoming White House press secretary, tweeted.

Why it matters: President Trump ordered entry bans lifted for travelers from the U.K., Ireland, Brazil and much of Europe to go into effect Jan. 26, but the Biden administration will "strengthen public health measures around international travel in order to further mitigate the spread of COVID-19," Jen Psaki said. Biden will be inaugurated on Wednesday, Jan. 20 and Trump will no longer be president by the time the order is set to go into effect.

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