Photo: Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump, his 2020 campaign and the RNC sued California Tuesday over its law that requires presidential and gubernatorial candidates to release their 5 most recent years' tax returns before they can appear on the state's primary ballot.

The big picture: The California law directly challenges Trump's continued refusal to release his tax returns, but the lawsuits argue it violates the Constitution by creating an extra requirement to become president.

  • The Constitution has 3 requirements for president — be a natural born citizen, be at least 35 or older and be a U.S. resident for at least 14 years.

The state of play: The two suits were filed in the Eastern District of California — one by the RNC, the California Republican Party and several California Republican voters, and the other by Trump and his campaign — and mark "the latest flash point between the White House and the state of California, which is involved in more than 40 lawsuits against the Trump administration," the NYT's Annie Karni writes.

  • Trump and the Treasury Department are in several legal battles with the House Ways and Means Committee and New York state officials, respectively, over his federal and state tax returns.

Read Trump's lawsuit:

Go deeper: Justice Department backs Treasury on blocking Trump tax returns

Go deeper

Coronavirus cases rise in 25 states

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Data: The COVID Tracking Project, state health departments; Map: Andrew Witherspoon, Sara Wise/Axios

New coronavirus infections rose over the past week in half the country.

Why it matters: The U.S. remains largely unable or unwilling to control the spread of the virus.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 3 a.m. ET: 33,976,447 — Total deaths: 1,014,266 — Total recoveries: 23,644,023Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 3 a.m. ET: 7,233,945 — Total deaths: 206,959 — Total recoveries: 2,840,688 — Total tests: 103,939,667Map.
  3. Education: School-aged children now make up 10% of all U.S COVID-19 cases.
  4. Health: Moderna says its coronavirus vaccine won't be ready until 2021
  5. Travel: CDC: 3,689 COVID-19 or coronavirus-like cases found on cruise ships in U.S. waters — Airlines begin mass layoffs while clinging to hope for federal aid
  6. Business: Real-time data show economy's rebound slowing but still going.
  7. Sports: Steelers-Titans NFL game delayed after coronavirus outbreak.
Updated 3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Trump signs stopgap bill to prevent government shutdown

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnel and President Trump arrives at the U.S. Capitol in March. Photo: Samuel Corum/Getty Images

President Trump signed a bill to extend current levels of government funding after funding expired briefly, White House spokesperson Judd Deere confirmed early Thursday.

Why it matters: The move averts a government shutdown before the Nov. 3 election. The Senate on Wednesday passed the legislation to fund the federal government through Dec. 11, by a vote of 84-10.