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President Trump on an unannounced Thanksgiving day visit at Bagram Air Field in Afghanistan. Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump's Thanksgiving declaration that the U.S. has relaunched peace talks with the Taliban apparently caught the Taliban by surprise, the New York Times reports.

The big picture: Trump's stated belief that the group now wants a cease-fire exceeds the terms of the Afghan peace plan that both countries were prepared to sign in September.

  • Neither the Taliban nor the Afghan government indicated on Friday that a cease-fire is currently being discussed with the U.S., per the Washington Post.
  • Trump faced significant skepticism from Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and national security adviser John Bolton about whether the peace deal draft earlier this year — which did not explicitly include an agreement for a cease-fire — was strong enough for the U.S. to sign.

Where it stands: The Afghan government set ceasefire as a precondition for further peace talks with the Taliban last month, per the Post. The Taliban told the Post that the group holds "the same stance to resume the talks" since Trump abruptly suspended the negotiations in September following a deadly bombing in Kabul, Afghanistan.

Go deeper: Taliban attacks kill at least 48 in Afghanistan after U.S. peace talks fail

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Trump's legacy is shaped by his narrow interests

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

President Trump's policy legacy is as much defined by what he's ignored as by what he's involved himself in.

The big picture: Over the past four years, Trump has interested himself in only a slim slice of the government he leads. Outside of trade, immigration, a personal war against the "Deep State" and the hot foreign policy issue of the moment, Trump has left many of his Cabinet secretaries to work without interruption, let alone direction.

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AI and automation are receiving a boost during the coronavirus pandemic that in the short term is creating a new hybrid workforce rather than destroying jobs outright.

The big picture: While the forces of automation and AI will eliminate some jobs and create some new ones, the vast majority will remain but be dramatically changed. The challenge for employers will be ensuring workforces are ready for the effects of technology.