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Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

President Trump had a busy Wednesday morning on Twitter, retweeting a number of tweets from parody and fan accounts.

Why it matters: Trump's Twitter is his favorite form of direct communication to the American people — former White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer once called Trump's tweets "official statements" — yet the accounts he retweeted are littered with controversial statements, inaccuracies and misinformation.

The retweets

Reality check: Along with a host of prominent Democrats, one of the individuals accused of treason in this tweet is Trump's own Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein — as well as Special Counsel Robert Mueller.

The big picture: GM has been on Trump's mind since its decision to idle four plants in the U.S. and cut 15% of its salaried workforce. He tweeted Tuesday that he is looking at ending electric vehicle subsidies for the automaker.

  • As Axios' Dan Primack notes, there are no GM-specific electric vehicle subsidies. Instead, there are industrywide federal tax credits of up to $7,500 on EVs purchased in the United States. Trump also could not end the credits without the help of Congress, which soon will have a Democrat-controlled House.

Reality check: The $3,874 figure appears to be from a debunked internet rumor about payments received by refugees in Canada. According to the Refugee Cash Assistance program, a family of two in the U.S. that is not working and eligible for the program receives $420 a month for the first eight months.

The backdrop: Trump said earlier this month that migrants throwing rocks at border agents and military personnel that he sent to the border would constitute lethal action: "They want to throw rocks at our military, our military fights back. We're going to consider it — I told them, consider it a rifle."

Reality check: This is a parody account of Vice President Mike Pence.

Reality check: In this clip, Clinton is calling out the interviewer for confusing prominent African-American Democrats Eric Holder and Cory Booker, insinuating that the interviewer thinks "they all look alike."

Go deeper: Trump's tweet by dictation

Go deeper

Updated 5 hours ago - World

Mexican President López Obrador tests positive for coronavirus

Mexico's President Andrés Manuel López Obrador during a press conference at National Palace in Mexico City, Mexico, on Wednesday. Photo: Ismael Rosas/Eyepix Group/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador announced Sunday evening that he's tested positive for COVID-19.

Driving the news: López Obrador tweeted that he has mild symptoms and is receiving medical treatment. "As always, I am optimistic," he added. "We will all move forward."

5 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Sarah Huckabee Sanders to run for governor of Arkansas

Sarah Huckabee Sanders at FOX News' studios in New York City in 2019. Photo: Steven Ferdman/Getty Images

Former White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders will announce Monday that she's running for governor of Arkansas.

The big picture: Sanders was touted as a contender after it was announced she was leaving the Trump administration in June 2019. Then-President Trump tweeted he hoped she would run for governor, adding "she would be fantastic." Sanders is "seen as leader in the polls" in the Republican state, notes the Washington Post's Josh Dawsey, who first reported the news.

Coronavirus has inflamed global inequality

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

History will likely remember the pandemic as the "first time since records began that inequality rose in virtually every country on earth at the same time." That's the verdict from Oxfam's inequality report covering the year 2020 — a terrible year that hit the poorest, hardest across the planet.

Why it matters: The world's poorest were already in a race against time, facing down an existential risk in the form of global climate change. The coronavirus pandemic could set global poverty reduction back as much as a full decade, according to the World Bank.