Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

President Trump had a busy Wednesday morning on Twitter, retweeting a number of tweets from parody and fan accounts.

Why it matters: Trump's Twitter is his favorite form of direct communication to the American people — former White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer once called Trump's tweets "official statements" — yet the accounts he retweeted are littered with controversial statements, inaccuracies and misinformation.

The retweets

Reality check: Along with a host of prominent Democrats, one of the individuals accused of treason in this tweet is Trump's own Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein — as well as Special Counsel Robert Mueller.

The big picture: GM has been on Trump's mind since its decision to idle four plants in the U.S. and cut 15% of its salaried workforce. He tweeted Tuesday that he is looking at ending electric vehicle subsidies for the automaker.

  • As Axios' Dan Primack notes, there are no GM-specific electric vehicle subsidies. Instead, there are industrywide federal tax credits of up to $7,500 on EVs purchased in the United States. Trump also could not end the credits without the help of Congress, which soon will have a Democrat-controlled House.

Reality check: The $3,874 figure appears to be from a debunked internet rumor about payments received by refugees in Canada. According to the Refugee Cash Assistance program, a family of two in the U.S. that is not working and eligible for the program receives $420 a month for the first eight months.

The backdrop: Trump said earlier this month that migrants throwing rocks at border agents and military personnel that he sent to the border would constitute lethal action: "They want to throw rocks at our military, our military fights back. We're going to consider it — I told them, consider it a rifle."

Reality check: This is a parody account of Vice President Mike Pence.

Reality check: In this clip, Clinton is calling out the interviewer for confusing prominent African-American Democrats Eric Holder and Cory Booker, insinuating that the interviewer thinks "they all look alike."

Go deeper: Trump's tweet by dictation

Go deeper

Updated 47 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 7:30 p.m. ET: 18,982,658 — Total deaths: 712,266— Total recoveries — 11,477,642Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 7:30 p.m. ET: 4,873,747 — Total deaths: 159,931 — Total recoveries: 1,598,624 — Total tests: 59,652,675Map.
  3. Politics: Pelosi rips GOP over stimulus negotiations: "Perhaps you mistook them for somebody who gives a damn" — Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine tests positive.
  4. Public health: Majority of Americans say states reopened too quicklyFauci says task force will examine aerosolized spread.
  5. Business: The health care sector imploded in Q2More farmers are declaring bankruptcyJuly's jobs report could be an inflection point for the recovery.
  6. Sports: Where college football's biggest conferences stand on playing.
1 hour ago - World

Nuclear free-for-all: The arms control era may be ending

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The mushroom clouds over Hiroshima and Nagasaki have remained unreplicated for 75 years in part because the U.S. and Soviet Union — after peering over the ledge into nuclear armageddon — began to negotiate.

Why it matters: The arms control era that began after the Cuban Missile Crisis may now be coming to a close. The next phase could be a nuclear free-for-all.

Pelosi, Schumer demand postmaster general reverse USPS cuts ahead of election

Schumer and Pelosi. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer sent a letter to Postmaster General Louis DeJoy on Thursday calling for the recent Trump appointee to reverse operational changes to the U.S. Postal Service that "threaten the timely delivery of mail" ahead of the 2020 election.

Why it matters: U.S. mail and election infrastructure are facing a test like no other this November, with a record-breaking number of mail-in ballots expected as Americans attempt to vote in the midst of a pandemic.