Nov 27, 2018

Trump says he'll consider ending electric vehicle subsidies for GM

Chevy Volt electric vehicle goes through assembly at the General Motors Detroit Hamtramck assembly plant. Photo: Bill Pugliano via Getty Images

President Trump said on Twitter Tuesday that he is looking at ending electric vehicle subsidies for General Motors over its decision to idle four plants in the U.S. and cut 15% of its salaried workforce.

Be smart: As Axios' Dan Primack notes, there are no GM-specific electric vehicle subsidies. Instead, there are industrywide federal tax credits of up to $7,500 on EVs purchased in the United States, with aggregate caps of 200,000 vehicles per manufacturer. GM is currently bumping up against its cap, while Tesla has already hit it. Trump also could not end the credits without the help of Congress, which soon will have a Democrat-controlled House.

"Very disappointed with General Motors and their CEO, Mary Barra, for closing plants in Ohio, Michigan and Maryland. Nothing being closed in Mexico & China. The U.S. saved General Motors, and this is the THANKS we get! We are now looking at cutting all @GM subsidies, including ... for electric cars. General Motors made a big China bet years ago when they built plants there (and in Mexico) - don’t think that bet is going to pay off. I am here to protect America’s Workers!"
— President Trump on Twitter

The big picture: White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow told reporters earlier Tuesday that Trump felt like GM "turned their back on him." Politics is always personal for Trump, and in this instance, GM's move could result in very real policy implications.

Go deeper: Tesla and GM push new EV tax credit

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Dominic Cummings: "I respectfully disagree" that I broke U.K. lockdown rules

Photo: Peter Summers/Getty Images

Dominic Cummings, the top aide to British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, defended himself Monday against allegations that he broke the U.K.'s coronavirus lockdown rules during a Downing Street press conference.

What he said: "I respectfully disagree. The legal rules do not necessarily cover all circumstances, especially the ones I found myself in."

Netanyahu says July 1 deadline for West Bank annexation won't change

Photo: Artur Widak/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said Monday at a Likud Party faction meeting at the Knesset, Israel's parliament, that his July 1 deadline for starting the process of annexation in the West Bank will not change, according to people in attendance.

Why it matters: The White House and the State Department have stressed over the last few weeks that the deadline set by Netanyahu is "not sacred" to the Trump administration — and that any discussion of annexation needs to be in the context of renewed Israeli-Palestinian peace talks.

Trump threatens to move Republican convention from North Carolina if capacity reduced

President Trump on stage during the 2016 Republican National Convention in Ohio. Photo: Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call via Getty Images

President Trump threatened in a series of Monday tweets to move this summer's Republican National Convention from Charlotte if North Carolina's Democratic governor, Roy Cooper, doesn't allow the event to be held at full capacity.

The state of play: Mandy Cohen, the state's health and human services secretary, said last week that the GOP should "plan for the worst" as mass gatherings will be a "very big challenge" if the number of coronavirus cases in the state continues to increase, per NPR.