Oct 22, 2019

Trump: Republicans must get tougher and fight impeachment threat

President Trump and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo in a Cabinet meeting in the White House, Oct. 21. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

President Trump denounced Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah) Monday as he said Republicans "have to get tougher and fight" because the Democrats are "trying to hurt" the GOP before the 2020 election, as the House impeachment inquiry looms.

"I think they're lousy politicians. But two things they have: They're vicious and they stick together. They don't have Mitt Romney in their midst. They don't have people like that. They stick together. You never see them break off."
— Trump speaking about Democrats

The big picture: Trump made the remarks during a lengthy Cabinet meeting, a day after "Axios on HBO" broadcast an interview with Romney during which he said Trump's appeals to China and Ukraine to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden were "shocking" and a "mistake."

Go deeper: The 2 Republican senators to watch as Trump's impeachment looms

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Giuliani pens defiant WSJ op-ed ahead of impeachment hearings

President Trump's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani to the Organization of Iranian American Communities in New York City on Sept. 24. Photo: Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani penned an op-ed in the Wall Street Journal Tuesday attacking Democrats and defending the Ukraine call ahead of the start of public hearings in the impeachment inquiry — which he labeled "unprecedented, constitutionally questionable."

What he's saying: In the op-ed, Giuliani outlined why he believes Trump's July 25 phone conversation with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, which triggered a whistleblower's complaint and Democrats' subsequent inquiry, was "innocent."

Go deeperArrowNov 13, 2019

House vs. Senate Republicans on impeachment

Trump enters "The Beast" in Alabama on Nov. 9. Photo: Reuters/Tom Brenner

Republicans are divided in their approach to defend President Trump in the impeachment inquiry, AP reports.

What's happening: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has privately advised his colleagues to say as little about impeachment as possible. Last month, he held a meeting on the Senate's trial rules of procedure. Meanwhile, House Republicans have taken a bolder stance.

Go deeperArrowNov 9, 2019

How an impeached Trump wins

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

President Trump is showing how he could be impeached, survive and still win re-election, something never done before in American history.

Between the lines: Trump officials think two things must unfold for this to happen: Republicans must stay unified, in votes and voice, and the economy must be strong, in jobs and market returns. The trends are strong on both fronts.