President Trump speaks during his rally in Battle Creek, Michigan, Wednesday. Photo: Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images

Rep. Debbie Dingell (D-Mich.) responded Wednesday night after President Trump used his Michigan rally to mock her and her late husband, former Rep. John Dingell, whom the president suggested may be in hell, saying his words were "hurtful."

"Mr. President, let's set politics aside. My husband earned all his accolades after a lifetime of service. I'm preparing for the first holiday season without the man I love. You brought me down in a way you can never imagine and your hurtful words just made my healing much harder."
— Debbie Dingell's tweet

Background: John Dingell was the longest-serving member in the history of Congress. He died in February at the age of 92.

What they're saying: Asked about Trump's comments, White House press secretary Stephanie Grisham told Good Morning America on Thursday that "the president is a counter-puncher."

Two Republican congressmen from Michigan, who voted against the articles of impeachment, asked the president to apologize.

  • Rep. Fred Upton tweeted, "I’ve always looked up to John Dingell - my good friend and a great Michigan legend. There was no need to 'dis' him in a crass political way. Most unfortunate and an apology is due."
  • Rep. Paul Mitchell wrote: "John Dingell was a well-respected man & I consider Debbie a close colleague and friend. To use his name in such a dishonorable manner at last night’s rally is unacceptable from anyone, let alone the President of the United States," adding, "An apology is due, Mr. President."

Go deeper: Trump rallies Michigan supporters minutes into his impeachment

Editor's note: This article has been updated with more details and context.

Go deeper

McConnell: Confirming Amy Coney Barrett will help GOP retain Senate

Photo: Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) expressed no regrets about Judge Amy Coney Barrett's controversial confirmation, telling Politico in an interview that he believes the decision to place her on the Supreme Court just a week before the election will help Republicans retain the Senate.

Why it matters: With a week to go until Election Day, many Republicans are concerned that President Trump's unpopularity could cost them the Senate. McConnell has long viewed the transformation of the federal judiciary through the confirmation of young conservative judges as his defining legacy.

51 mins ago - Podcasts

The fight over fracking

Fracking has become a flashpoint in the election's final week, particularly in Pennsylvania where both President Trump and Joe Biden made stops on Monday. But much of the political rhetoric has ignored that the industry has gone from boom to bust, beset by layoffs, bankruptcies and fire-sale mergers.

Axios Re:Cap digs into the state of fracking, and what it means for the future of American energy, with Bob McNally, president of Rapidan Energy Group.

Democrats sound alarm on mail-in votes

Photo: Mark Makela/Getty Images

Democrats are calling a last-minute audible on mail-in voting after last night's Supreme Court ruling on Wisconsin.

Driving the news: Wisconsin Democrats and the Democratic secretary of state of Michigan are urging voters to return absentee ballots to election clerks’ offices or drop boxes. They are warning that the USPS may not be able to deliver ballots by the Election Day deadline.