President Trump repeatedly declined at a press briefing to specify what crime he accused former President Obama of committing in a series of tweets over the weekend and Monday morning, telling reporters: "You know what the crime is. The crime is very obvious to everybody."

Why it matters: In the wake of the Justice Department's decision to drop charges against former national security adviser Michael Flynn, Trump has sent hundreds of tweets and retweets of conservative media — many of which use the phrase "Obamagate" — that allege the Russia investigation was a political hit job directed by the former president.

  • Trump called it the "biggest political crime in American history, by far!" on Sunday and tweeted that "OBAMAGATE makes Watergate look small time" on Monday morning.
  • He also responded to an article from The Federalist on Monday that asked why Obama allegedly told the FBI under James Comey to withhold intelligence from the incoming Trump administration: "Because it was OBAMAGATE, and he and Sleepy Joe led the charge. The most corrupt administration in U.S. history!"

What they're saying: Trump told reporters on Monday: "Obamagate, it's been going on for a long time. ... Some terrible things happened, and it should never be allowed to happen in our country again. And you'll be seeing what's going on over the coming weeks."

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The top Republicans who aren't voting for Trump in 2020

Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan said last week that he cannot support President Trump's re-election.

Why it matters: Hogan, a moderate governor in a blue state, joins other prominent Republicans who have publicly said they will either not vote for Trump's re-election this November or will back Biden.

Updated Aug 17, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Trump's former Homeland Security chief of staff endorses Joe Biden

Miles Taylor, the former Department of Homeland Security chief of staff under President Trump, endorsed Joe Biden for president in a video funded by Republican Voters Against Trump.

Why it matters: Taylor's blistering criticism of Trump adds to the chorus of former top administration officials who have spoken out against the president after leaving office — most notably former national security adviser John Bolton and former Defense Secretary James Mattis.

Senate report finds Manafort passed campaign data to Russian intelligence officer

Paul Manafort. Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

The Senate Intelligence Committee on Tuesday released the fifth and final volume of its report on Russian interference in the 2016 election, which details "counterintelligence threats and vulnerabilities."

Why it matters: The bipartisan, 966-page report goes further than the Mueller report in showing the extent of Russia's connections to members of the Trump campaign, and how the Kremlin was able to take advantage of the transition team's inexperience to gain access to sensitive information.