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In his first public comments since Joe Biden selected Sen. Kamala Harris to be his running mate, President Trump said Harris was "the meanest, the most horrible, most disrespectful" of any senator during Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation hearings.

Why it matters: Harris, a former prosecutor who sits on the Senate Judiciary Committee, elevated her national profile significantly after grilling Kavanaugh in September 2018 about allegations of sexual assault. The highly contentious hearings ultimately did not stop Kavanaugh from getting confirmed by the Republican-controlled Senate.

What he's saying: "She was my No. 1 draft pick, and we'll see how she works out. She did very, very poorly in the primaries, as you know. She was expected to do well. And she ended up right around 2%," Trump said at a press briefing.

  • "So I was a little surprised he picked her. I've been watching her for a long time and I was a little surprised," he continued.
  • "She was extraordinarily nasty to Kavanaugh, Judge Kavanaugh, now Justice Kavanaugh. She was nasty to a level that was just a horrible thing the way she was, the way she treated now-Justice Kavanaugh. And I won't forget that soon."

Go deeper: More reactions from the political world on Biden picking Harris

Go deeper

Nov 10, 2020 - Health

Supreme Court appears likely to save most of the Affordable Care Act

Photo: Al Drago/Getty Images

Most of the Affordable Care Act appeared likely to survive Tuesday as the Supreme Court heard oral arguments over the law’s individual mandate.

The big picture: Two members of the court’s conservative majority — Chief Justice John Roberts and Justice Brett Kavanaugh — suggested they’re unlikely to throw out the entire health care law, as Republican attorneys general and the Trump administration have urged. Their votes would be enough to save it.

The social media addiction bubble

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Right now, everyone from Senate leaders to the makers of Netflix's popular "Social Dilemma" is promoting the idea that Facebook is addictive.

Yes, but: Human beings have raised fears about the addictive nature of every new media technology since the 18th century brought us the novel, yet the species has always seemed to recover its balance once the initial infatuation wears off.

Young people's next big COVID test

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Young, healthy people will be at the back of the line for coronavirus vaccines, and they'll have to maintain their sense of urgency as they wait their turn — otherwise, vaccinations won't be as effective in bringing the pandemic to a close.

The big picture: "It’s great young people are anticipating the vaccine," said Jewel Mullen, associate dean for health equity at the University of Texas. But the prospect of that enthusiasm waning is "a cause for concern," she said.