Oct 25, 2019

Trump Organization considers sale of flagship D.C. hotel

Photo: Jonathan Newton/The Washington Post via Getty Images

The Trump Organization is considering selling the rights to the Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C., reports the Wall Street Journal.

The big picture: Eric Trump, President Trump's son and an executive vice president of the family business, told the WSJ that the move is in part fueled by criticism surrounding the family profiting from the property during Trump's presidency.

  • The Constitution bans presidents from receiving payments from foreign and domestic officials under its emoluments clause. This has sparked concerns because the hotel has become the center of Trumpworld in D.C.
  • Trump has received criticism for placing his sons in charge of a trust running his businesses rather than following precedent by selling them off.
  • "People are objecting to us making so much money on the hotel, and therefore we may be willing to sell,” Eric Trump said. "Since we opened our doors, we have received tremendous interest in this hotel and as real-estate developers, we are always willing to explore our options."

The backdrop: The House Transportation Committee subpoenaed the General Services Administration for documents relating to the hotel's lease this week. And earlier this month, an appeals court revived an emoluments lawsuit against the president regarding the hotel.

Go deeper ... Mulvaney: Trump was "honestly surprised" at level of backlash over G7 decision

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Trump says he will campaign against Lisa Murkowski after her support for Mattis

Trump with Barr and Meadows outside St. John's Episcopal church in Washington, D.C. on June 1. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump tweeted on Thursday that he would endorse "any candidate" with a pulse who runs against Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska).

Driving the news: Murkowski said on Thursday that she supported former defense secretary James Mattis' condemnation of Trump over his response to protests in the wake of George Floyd's killing. She described Mattis' statement as "true, honest, necessary and overdue," Politico's Andrew Desiderio reports.

51 mins ago - World

The president vs. the Pentagon

Trump visits Mattis and the Pentagon in 2018. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty

Over the course of just a few hours, President Trump was rebuffed by the Secretary of Defense over his call for troops in the streets and accused by James Mattis, his former Pentagon chief, of trampling the Constitution for political gain.

Why it matters: Current and former leaders of the U.S. military are drawing a line over Trump's demand for a militarized response to the protests and unrest that have swept the country over the killing of George Floyd by police.

New York Times says Tom Cotton op-ed did not meet standards

Photo: Avalon/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)

A New York Times spokesperson said in a statement Thursday that the paper will be changing its editorial board processes after a Wednesday op-ed by Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.), which called for President Trump to "send in the troops" in order to quell violent protests, failed to meet its standards.

Why it matters: The shift comes after Times employees began a coordinated movement on social media on Wednesday and Thursday that argued that publishing the op-ed put black staff in danger. Cotton wrote that Trump should invoke the Insurrection Act in order to deploy the U.S. military against rioters that have overwhelmed police forces in cities across the country.