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Alan Dershowitz. Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images

President Trump's legal team continued its opening arguments on the sixth day of his Senate impeachment trial on Monday.

The big picture: Trump's defense team hit hard on historical precedents, the Bidens, Burisma and the House impeachment managers. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell ended the day grinning broadly during Alan Dershowitz's remarks that the articles are not crimes, receiving handshakes from several GOP senators after, in addition to Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W. Va.)

The state of play: Trump's team largely shied away from Sunday's dramatic 11th-hour curveball via a leak from former national security adviser John Bolton's book that contradicts what the White House has been telling the country on Ukraine.

  • Dershowitz, who spoke in the 8pm hour, was the only member of the team to namecheck Bolton.
  • "Nothing in the Bolton revelations, even if true, would rise to the level of an abuse of power or an impeachable offense," Dershowitz said.
  • GOP sources say the revelation could be enough to sway some Republican senators to call witnesses.

The highlights:

  • Trump lawyer Jay Sekulow argued that "not a single witness testified that the president himself said that there was any connection between any investigation and security assistance, a presidential meeting or anything else" on Ukraine.
  • Kenneth Starr warned against normalizing impeachment, stating that for much of early American history "the sword of presidential impeachment had been sheathed."
  • There could be no quid pro quo for a White House meeting for Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, Deputy White House counsel Mike Purpura said, because Trump invited his counterpart three separate times — despite the fact that no such meeting ever occurred, though the two did later meet at the UN General Assembly.
  • Trump lawyer Jane Raskin defended former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani, arguing that his involvement is a "colorful distraction" pushed by House Democrats. The House subpoenaed documents from Giuliani but did not subpoena him to testify.
  • Former Florida attorney general Pam Bondi outlined the administration's rationale for investigating Hunter Biden, offering a timeline of his involvement in Ukraine and his role on the board of Burisma.

What you need to know:

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Off the Rails

Episode 7: Trump turns on Pence

Photo illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios. Photos: Elijah Nouvelage, Alex Wong/Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. Axios takes you inside the collapse of a president with a special series.

Episode 7: Trump turns on Pence. Trump believes the vice president can solve all his problems by simply refusing to certify the Electoral College results. It's a simple test of loyalty: Trump or the U.S. Constitution.

"The end is coming, Donald."

The male voice in the TV ad boomed through the White House residence during "Fox & Friends" commercial breaks. Over and over and over. "The end is coming, Donald. ... On Jan. 6, Mike Pence will put the nail in your political coffin."

Big Tech's post-riot reckoning

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

The Capitol insurrection means the anti-tech talk in Washington is more likely to lead to action, since it's ever clearer that the attack was planned, at least in part, on social media.

Why it matters: The big platforms may have hoped they'd move to D.C.'s back burner, with the Hill focused on the Biden agenda and the pandemic out of control. But now, there'll be no escaping harsh scrutiny.

35 mins ago - Technology

Why domestic terrorists are so hard to police online

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Domestic terrorism has proven to be more difficult for Big Tech companies to police online than foreign terrorism.

The big picture: That's largely because the politics are harder. There's more unity around the need to go after foreign extremists than domestic ones — and less danger of overreaching and provoking a backlash.