John Roberts swears in members of the Senate for the impeachment trial against President Trump. Photo: Senate Television via AP

We're about to get our first impeachment trial in HD, but the rules and procedures are like entering a time capsule.

Driving the news: Senators sat quietly in their seats while Rep. Adam Schiff read the articles aloud.

  • They stood as a group while Chief Justice John Roberts was sworn in, and they remained standing as he swore them in.
  • Reporters were forced back to paper notebooks, since they aren't allowed to bring any technology such as phones or laptops into the Senate chamber.

Between the lines: For the next few weeks, the Senate will be an extremely different institution — with consequences that extend to the Democratic presidential primaries.

  • Starting at 1 p.m. ET on Tuesday, Sens. Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren and Amy Klobuchar will be busy on Capitol Hill, with Joe Biden and Pete Buttigieg free to barnstorm Iowa.
  • Sanders would "rather be in Iowa today," he told Politico. "There’s a caucus there in two-and-a-half weeks. I’d rather be in New Hampshire and Nevada. But I swore a constitutional oath as a U.S. senator to do my job.”

What's next:

  • House briefs due 5 p.m. Saturday.
  • Trump's briefs due 12 p.m. Monday.
  • House reply due 12 p.m. Tuesday.
  • Opening arguments begin 1 p.m. Tuesday.

Go deeper: Watch Chief Justice John Roberts swear in senators

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