White House Deputy Press Secretary Hogan Gidley and Trump's personal lawyer Jay Sekulow return from a dinner recess Thursday night at the Senate impeachment trial. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

President Trump's team is considering using just a portion of the 24 hours they're given for arguments in his impeachment trial.

Why it matters: A truncated defense would likely reflect a decision not to contest facts or defend Trump point by point, but rather to try to diminish the legitimacy of Democrats' overall case and end the trial as quickly as possible.

  • But if the White House moves too abruptly, it risks angering the small group of Republican senators Democrats have been courting to cross party lines to allow new witnesses and evidence in the trial.

What we're hearing: Just because Trump's team can use up to three days to present their case doesn’t mean they will. Trump lawyer Jay Sekulow himself appeared to tease the idea it could wrap as early as Saturday — though other White House and Senate GOP aides later downplayed the notion they would cut back to just one day.

  • "We’re not going to try to run the clock out," Sekulow told reporters Thursday, adding that whether the defense concludes “Saturday or Monday or Tuesday,” he is confident “the case will be made defending the president."
  • Meanwhile, two sources familiar with the Trump team's plans told Axios they don't anticipate using all 24 hours.
  • Instead, the team plans to adjust their arguments to what some of the more vulnerable Senate Republicans need to get them over the acquittal line.
  • "They'll use their time to get their facts out there, however long that may be," one of the sources said, adding that Trump's team recognizes that some Republicans are eager to hear a full-throated defense of Trump that wipes away any doubts about his culpability.
  • Another aide added that even if Trump's lawyers only use half of the time they're allotted, they'll likely split it up over at least two days — in part because of TV ratings. "No one wants to watch this on their Saturday."

But one thing they all agree on is they don't need to fill the hours just for the sake of it, with the sources noting that both House prosecutors and former President Bill Clinton's defense team each used fewer than 12 hours during the 1999 trial.

The bottom line: When your strategy is "concede nothing, admit nothing, apologize for nothing," it doesn't have to take very long.

Go deeper

New York City schools will not fully reopen in fall

Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced at a press conference on Wednesday that schools will not fully reopen in fall, and will instead adopt a hybrid model that will limit in-person attendance to just one to three days a week.

Why it matters: New York City, once the epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak in the United States, is home to the nation's largest public school district — totaling 1,800 schools and 1.1 million students, according to the New York Times. The partial reopening plan could prevent hundreds of thousands of parents from fully returning to work.

Treasury blames lenders for PPP disclosure debacle

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The U.S. Treasury Department is pointing the finger at lenders for errors discovered in Monday's PPP data disclosure.

What they're saying: "Companies listed had their PPP applications entered into SBA’s Electronic Transmission (ETran) system by an approved PPP lender. If a lender did not cancel the loan in the ETran system, the loan is listed," a senior administration official said.

Updated 30 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 10:30 a.m. ET: 11,863,477 — Total deaths: 544,949 — Total recoveries — 6,483,402Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 10:30 a.m. ET: 2,996,679 — Total deaths: 131,486 — Total recoveries: 936,476 — Total tested: 36,878,106Map.
  3. Public health: Deaths are rising in hotspots — Déjà vu sets in as testing issues rise and PPE dwindles.
  4. Travel: How the pandemic changed mobility habits, by state.
  5. Education: Harvard and MIT sue Trump administration over rule barring foreign students from online classes.
  6. 🎧 Podcast: A misinformation "infodemic" is here.