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Acting Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf and President Trump speaks at a briefing in Beverly Hills, California, in February. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, National Retail Federation and National Association of Manufacturers filed a lawsuit in San Francisco against the Trump administration on Tuesday over federal immigration restrictions.

Driving the news: The suit comes in response to the administration's move to ban entry into the U.S. through the end of this year for foreigners on certain temporary work visas — including high-skilled H-1B visas that are relied on by big U.S. tech companies.

"Our lawsuit seeks to overturn these sweeping and unlawful immigration restrictions that are an unequivocal 'not welcome' sign to the engineers, executives, IT experts, doctors, nurses, and other critical workers who help drive the American economy."
— joint statement by the business groups
  • The business groups said in a statement they took the action against Department of Homeland Security, Acting Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf, the State Department and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo because "these restrictions will push investment abroad, inhibit economic growth, and reduce job creation" if left in place.

The big picture, per Axios' Stef Kight: President Trump has leveraged emergency powers and economic concern from the coronavirus to slowly shut down large parts of the immigration system— even as he urges states to reopen.

  • The restrictions that came into effect on June 24 expand on Trump's earlier coronavirus-related immigration ban introduced in late April and also extended through the end of the year.
  • Also impacted by these measures are visas for H-1B spouses, H-2Bs for non-agriculture workers, J-1 exchange visas for short-term workers, and L visas, which allow companies to transfer employees working overseas to U.S. offices.
  • The Trump administration did not immediately return Axios' requests for comment on the lawsuit.

Read the complaint via DocumentCloud:

Editor's note: This article has been updated with new details throughout.

Go deeper

Sep 28, 2020 - Technology

Exclusive: Where Trump and Biden stand on tech issues

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Getty Images photos: Win McNamee and Saul Loeb/AFP

Joe Biden has laid out a more concrete tech agenda whereas President Trump has focused on tax cuts and deregulation while criticizing tech firms for anti-conservative bias. That's according to a side-by-side analysis of the two candidates' tech records by the Information Technology & Innovation Foundation shared exclusively with Axios.

Why it matters: The tech industry needs to prepare for either four more years of Trump's impulsive policy approach or for a Biden administration that's likely to be critical of tech but slow to take action.

Salesforce rolls the dice on Slack

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Salesforce's likely acquisition of workplace messaging service Slack — not yet a done deal but widely anticipated to be announced Tuesday afternoon — represents a big gamble for everyone involved.

For Slack, challenged by competition from Microsoft, the bet is that a deeper-pocketed owner like Salesforce, with wide experience selling into large companies, will help the bottom line.

FBI stats show border cities are among the safest

Data: FBI, Kansas Bureau of Investigation; Note: This table includes the eight largest communities on the U.S.-Mexico border and eight other U.S. cities similar in population size and demographics; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

U.S. communities along the Mexico border are among the safest in America, with some border cities holding crime rates well below the national average, FBI statistics show.

Why it matters: The latest crime data collected by the FBI from 2019 contradicts the narrative by President Trump and others that the U.S.-Mexico border is a "lawless" region suffering from violence and mayhem.