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Photo: House TV

With soldiers guarding the Capitol halls, Donald J. Trump became the first president in American history to be impeached twice.

By the numbers: The tally for history: 232-197, with 10 Republicans voting to impeach. (None voted to impeach last year.)

Why it matters: Real cracks are showing in Trump's GOP support.

  • Top House Republican Kevin McCarthy, who opposed impeachment, said Trump "bears responsibility" for last week's insurrection.
  • Top Senate Republican Mitch McConnell left open a path to conviction, saying he'll listen to the arguments when presented to the Senate.
Screenshot: CNN

Between the lines: Trump called for “no violence” in a statement to Fox News today.

  • He had to distribute it via the media, White House statement and text message because he’s been suspended or banned from all major social media platforms.

What's next: The Senate trial will likely take place during the Biden administration, potentially changing the dynamics around conviction and removal.

  • McConnell won't be calling back the Senate ahead of Jan. 19.
  • His team thinks the idea that Trump could be convicted and removed from office before the inauguration is a fantasy, sources tell Axios' Alayna Treene.
  • The Senate trial requires much more logistical planning than the House impeachment.
  • That includes drafting and passing a resolution for what the Senate’s order of business will look like, walk-throughs in the chamber, and contacting the Supreme Court chief justice, who will preside.
  • A huge issue for McConnell, and one of the main reasons he declined reconvening for an emergency session, is avoiding conflicting with the all-hands-on-deck security slated for the inauguration.

The bottom line: A year ago this week, Trump's first impeachment trial began. A week ago today, a pro-Trump mob stormed the Capitol. A week from today, Joe Biden will be president.

Go deeper

GOP implosion: Trump threats, payback

Spotted last week on a work van in Evansville, Ind. Photo: Sam Owens/The Evansville Courier & Press via Reuters

The GOP is getting torn apart by a spreading revolt against party leaders for failing to stand up for former President Trump and punish his critics.

Why it matters: Republican leaders suffered a nightmarish two months in Washington. Outside the nation’s capital, it's even worse.

Sanders says Democrats will push coronavirus relief package through with simple majority

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) leaves the Senate floor on Jan. 1. Photo: Liz Lynch/Getty Images

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), incoming chair of the Senate Budget Committee who caucuses with the Democrats, told CNN's "State of the Union" on Sunday that Democrats plan to push a coronavirus relief package through the chamber with a simple majority vote.

Why it matters: "Budget reconciliation" would allow Democrats to forgo the Senate's 60-vote requirement and could potentially speed-up the next relief package for millions of unemployed Americans. Democrats hold the the 50-50 split in the Senate with Vice President Kamala Harris serving as the tie-breaking vote.

Focus group: Former Trump voters say he should never hold office again

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

"Relief" is the top emotion some swing voters who used to support Donald Trump say they felt as they watched President Biden's swearing-in, followed by "hope."

Why it matters: For voters on the bubble between parties, this moment is less about excitement for Biden or liberal politics than exhaustion and disgust with Trump and a craving for national healing. Most said Trump should be prohibited from ever holding office again.