President Trump suggested for the second time on Monday that Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg did not actually tell her granddaughter that her dying wish was to "not be replaced until a new president is installed," claiming it is "just too convenient."

Driving the news: Trump told "Fox & Friends" on Monday morning, "I don't know that she said that, or was that written out by Adam Schiff, and Schumer and Pelosi. I would be more inclined to the second, OK, you know, that came out of the wind, it sounds so beautiful. But that sounds like a Schumer deal or maybe a Pelosi or shifty Schiff."

  • He later added, "I mean, maybe she did and maybe she didn't."
  • Schiff, the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, tweeted in response: "Mr. President, this is low. Even for you. No, I didn’t write Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s dying wish to a nation she served so well, and spent her whole life making a more perfect union. But I am going to fight like hell to make it come true. No confirmation before inauguration."

The big picture: Trump told reporters that five women are on his list of potential Supreme Court nominees and that he plans to announce his decision on Friday or Saturday. He also reiterated that he would "much rather have a vote before the election," claiming that "it would be better for our country."

Go deeper ... Pence aide on RBG's dying wish: "The decision of when to nominate does not lie with her"

Go deeper

Senate Democrats block vote on McConnell's targeted COVID relief bill

Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

Senate Democrats on Wednesday blocked a vote on Republicans' $500 billion targeted COVID-19 relief bill, a far less comprehensive package than the $1.8 trillion+ deal currently being negotiated between the Trump administration and House Democrats.

Why it matters: There's little appetite in the Senate for a stimulus bill with a price tag as large as what President Trump and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi have been calling for. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's (R-Ky.) "skinny" proposal was mostly seen as a political maneuver, as it had little chance of making it out of the Senate.

Amy Harder, author of Generate
5 hours ago - Energy & Environment

Climate change goes mainstream in presidential debate

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty

The most notable part of Thursday’s presidential debate on climate change was the fact it was included as a topic and assumed as a fact.

The big picture: This is the first time in U.S. presidential history that climate change was a featured issue at a debate. It signals how the problem has become part of the fabric of our society. More extreme weather, like the wildfires ravaging Colorado, is pushing the topic to the front-burner.

Finally, a real debate

Photo: Morry Gash/AP

A more disciplined President Trump held back from the rowdy interruptions at tonight's debate in Nashville, while making some assertions so outlandish that Joe Biden chuckled and even closed his eyes. A Trump campaign adviser told Axios: "He finally listened." 

The result: A real debate.