Nov 25, 2019

Trump could begin deporting asylum-seekers to Honduras by 2020

A section of the southwest border. Photo: Daniel Woolfolk/AFP via Getty Images

The Trump administration could begin sending some Central American immigrants seeking asylum in the U.S. to Honduras by January 2020, although the details of the agreement are still being worked out, BuzzFeed News' Hamed Aleaziz reports.

Why it matters: The asylum agreements with Central American nations signed since the summer by former acting Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan are beginning to take effect. They could force people fleeing their homes to seek asylum in neighboring nations where there are often weak asylum systems, severe poverty and high crime rates.

Go deeper: Trump administration pushes new fees for asylum seekers, citizen applicants

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U.S. sends first Honduran asylum seeker sent to Guatemala

Dozens of people seen waiting to enter the U.S. on the Northern side of the International Bridge over the Rio Grande, in Matamoros, Tamaulipas state, Mexico. Photo: LEXIE HARRISON-CRIPPS/AFP via Getty Images

The first Honduran migrant was sent to Guatemala on Thursday to pursue his asylum case, the AP reports, kicking off a "landmark" Trump administration policy.

Flashback: Guatemala signed a "safe third country" agreement in July, agreeing to take in more Central American asylum seekers in an effort to slow migration in the U.S. The policy mostly impacts immigrants from Honduras and El Salvador whose routes to the U.S. go through Guatemala. Thousands of Guatemalans left the country last year to seek asylum in the U.S., Al Jazeera notes.

Go deeperArrowNov 22, 2019

Bolivia to issue arrest warrant against Evo Morales

Bolivia's former President Evo Morales speaks during a November event honoring him in Mexico City. Photo: Hector Vivas/Getty Images

Bolivia's former President Evo Morales will be accused of sedition in an arrest warrant authorities are preparing to issue against him within days, interim leader Jeanine Áñez told reporters, per Reuters.

The big picture: Morales is in Argentina, where he was granted refugee status this week, the New York Times reports. He spent last month in Mexico, which granted him asylum following his resignation amid protests against his disputed October election win.

Go deeper: South America's uprisings are about more than politics

Keep ReadingArrowDec 15, 2019

Thousands of Brazilians seeking asylum in the U.S.

Migrants mostly from Honduras, Guatemala and Brazil prepare cots to sleep on. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Nearly 17,000 Brazilian migrants have passed through El Paso, Texas in the past year, with many claiming fear of persecution or extreme economic hardship, AP reports.

Why it matters: Nationwide, 18,00 Brazilians were apprehended in the fiscal year ending in October — up 600% from 2016, per AP. The increase in Brazilian migrants coming to the U.S. highlights the Trump administration's efforts to block legal immigration for people who claim they are being persecuted, AP writes.

Go deeperArrowDec 14, 2019