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A Mexican asylum seeker showers in an encampment on Oct. 30, as she waits to seek asylum in the U.S. Photo: Reuters/Veronica G. Cardenas

The Trump administration proposed increasing fees on Friday for those seeking asylum in the U.S., as well as for some Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) applicants.

What's happening: If enacted, the proposal would increase the cost to apply for U.S. citizenship. As part of a crackdown on low-income immigrants, the Trump administration has also proposed penalizing those who use or are likely to use public benefits like food stamps or housing assistance.

By the numbers:

  • DACA recipients would pay an additional $275 every two years to renew their legal permits under the new DHS proposal, in addition to the $495 required for filing.
  • Asylum seekers would pay a $50 application fee for the first time under the proposal, the Wall Street Journal reports — making the U.S. "one of the few countries in the world to attach a fee to humanitarian protections."
  • Those applying to become U.S. citizens would pay $1,170 to apply, instead of $640, per the proposal — an 83% price increase.
  • Asylum applicants "with incomes under the federal poverty line" would pay a higher citizenship fee under the new proposal, per the WSJ.

What they're saying: The proposal says the asylum application fee and price increase aim to mitigate fee hikes of other immigration benefits.

“[T]he adjudication of immigration applications and petitions requires in-depth screening, incurring costs that must be covered by the agency, and this proposal accounts for our operational needs and better aligns our fee schedule with the costs of processing each request."
— Ken Cuccinelli, acting director of USCIS, in a statement on Friday

Background: President Trump has demanded that citizens and legal residents who sponsor immigrants in the U.S. pay the government back for any public benefits used by the sponsored immigrants.

  • The $50 asylum fee "wouldn’t apply to most migrants crossing the U.S.-Mexico border and asking for protection," per the WSJ.
  • DHS' proposed rule will be published in the Federal Register and open to public comment on Nov. 14, and its effective date won't be public until then. Many rules are effective a minimum of 30 days after going in Federal Register.

Go deeper: Trump's welfare crackdown targets immigrants

Go deeper

Ro Khanna wary of Biden approach on Middle East

Rep. Ro Khanna. Photo: Cody Glenn/Sportsfile for Web Summit via Getty Images

An outspoken progressive Democrat is wary of President Biden’s approach to the Middle East, arguing it’s like “conceding defeat of the aspiration” to win a Nobel Peace Prize.

Why it matters: A number of members of Biden’s own party dislike his Middle East strategy, as his administration signals the region is no longer the priority it was for President Obama and his predecessors.

Democrats eye reconciliation for immigration

Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Comprehensive immigration reform is a pipe dream, but some Senate Democrats are hoping to tie key immigration provisions to the next big reconciliation push.

Why it matters: Immigration is one of the most controversial and partisan issues in U.S. politics, which is why the budget reconciliation process — which allows for bills to pass the Senate with a simple majority rather than the usual 60 votes — is so attractive.

3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Scoop: Biden meeting Quad amid own pivot toward Asia

Artists paint portraits of President Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris in Mumbai, India. Photo: Anshuman Poyrekar/Hindustan Times via Getty Images

President Biden plans to meet this month with the leaders of Japan, Australia and India in a virtual summit of the so-called Quad, according to people familiar with the matter.

Why it matters: By putting a Quad meeting on the president’s schedule, the White House is signaling the importance of partnerships and alliances to counter China’s growing influence in the Indo-Pacific region.