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Roger Stone arriving at his sentencing hearing on Feb. 20. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

President Trump on Friday evening commuted the sentence of his longtime associate Roger Stone, according to two senior administration officials. Stone in February was sentenced to 40 months in prison for crimes including obstruction, witness tampering and making false statements to Congress.

Why it matters: The controversial move brings an abrupt end to the possibility of Stone spending time behind bars. He had been scheduled to report to prison on July 14.

  • It also concludes an ongoing dispute between Trump and his Justice Department over the length of Stone’s sentence, which exposed Attorney General Bill Barr to public criticism.

What they're saying: "Roger Stone is a victim of the Russia Hoax that the Left and its allies in the media perpetuated for years in an attempt to undermine the Trump Presidency," White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany said in a statement.

  • "Mr. Stone would be put at serious medical risk in prison. He has appealed his conviction and is seeking a new trial. He maintains his innocence and has stated that he expects to be fully exonerated by the justice system. Mr. Stone, like every American, deserves a fair trial and every opportunity to vindicate himself before the courts."

Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Calif.), chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, said in a statement Friday that Trump commuting Stone's sentence "is among the most offensive to the rule of law and principles of justice."

  • “Stone repeatedly lied to the House Intelligence Committee under oath and threatened a witness, all to cover up an effort by President Trump and his campaign to secretly communicate with Wikileaks and exploit its release of Russian-hacked emails targeting his opponent."

Background: The DOJ revised its original sentencing guidelines of seven to nine years of prison time for Stone after Trump complained in a tweet that it was a "miscarriage of justice," kicking off a wave of backlash and the resignation of a number of prosecutors.

  • During Stone's sentencing hearing, federal prosecutors ultimately argued within the parameters of the original sentencing guidelines.

Of note: Stone was the seventh person to be convicted and sentenced for crimes unearthed by former special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation.

  • The high-profile commutation follows Trump's post-impeachment clemency spree during which he commuted or pardoned multiple white-collar criminals convicted of crimes such as corruption, gambling fraud and racketeering.

Flashback: Stone and Trump have maintained a rapport for over three decades. After Stone met Trump through Ronald Reagan’s 1980 presidential campaign, he counseled the businessman through three potential presidential runs.

  • Trump in return hired Stone as a lobbyist to represent his businesses, according to The Atlantic.

Go deeper

Former top GOP fundraiser Elliott Broidy charged for foreign lobbying

Elliot Broidy (R) with business executive Fred Sands (L). Photo: Stefanie Keenan/Getty Images for Pepperdine University

Elliott Broidy, the former deputy finance chairman of the Republican National Committee, appears set to plead guilty to conspiracy to act as an unregistered foreign agent by lobbying the Trump administration to drop an investigation into the massive Malaysian embezzlement scheme 1MDB, according to a court filing.

Why it matters: Broidy is the latest 2016 Trump campaign associate to face criminal charges, joining former campaign chairman Paul Manafort, deputy chairman Rick Gates, chief executive Steve Bannon, adviser Michael Flynn, outside adviser Roger Stone and fellow deputy finance chairman Michael Cohen.

In photos: Twin Cities on edge after Daunte Wright shooting

Demonstrators shout "Don't shoot" at the police after curfew on April 12 as they protest the death of Daunte Wright, who was shot and killed by a police officer in Brooklyn Center, Minnesota, a day earlier. Photo: Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images

There were tense scenes in the Twin Cities suburb of Brooklyn Center Monday night, after demonstrators defied a 7 p.m. curfew to protest for a second night the fatal police shooting of Daunte Wright.

The big picture: The curfew was announced following a night of protests and unrest over the killing of Wright, 20, during a traffic stop Sunday. Following peaceful protests and a daytime vigil, police again deployed tear gas during clashes with protesters Monday night, according to reporters on the scene.

In photos: Life along the U.S.-Mexico border

Children at the border of the Puerto de Anapra colonia of Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, hang on a border fence and look to Sunland Park, N.M. Photo: Russell Contreras/Axios

Axios traveled to McAllen and El Paso, Texas, and Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, to see how the communities are responding to an increase of migrants from Central America.

Of note: The region in South and West Texas are among the poorest in the nation and rarely are the regions covered in depth beyond the soundbites and press conference. Axios reporters Stef Kight and Russell Contreras walked the streets of McAllen, El Paso, Texas, and Ciudad Juárez to record images that struck them.