Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

Two members of the Trump campaign staff who attended the president's rally in Tulsa on Saturday have tested positive for the coronavirus, according to the campaign's communications director Tim Murtaugh.

The big picture: The campaign says the two staffers wore face masks during the entire event, which drew thousands of supporters. Health officials, including several in Tulsa, had urged the campaign to delay the rally, warning of the risk of spreading the virus. Six campaign staffers for the president were quarantined after testing positive before the rally last week,.

What they're saying:

"After another round of testing for campaign staff in Tulsa, two additional members of the advance team tested positive for the coronavirus. These staff members attended the rally but were wearing masks during the entire event. Upon the positive tests, the campaign immediately activated established quarantine and contact tracing protocols."
— Communications director Tim Murtaugh

Worth noting: The White House said on Monday it is "scaling back" coronavirus temperature checks for visitors who enter the complex.

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