Sen. Tim Scott (R-S.C.) said on CNN's "State of the Union" Sunday that President Trump's retweet of a video featuring an apparent supporter yelling "white power" at protesters is "indefensible."

Why it matters: Scott is the only Black Republican in the Senate and is the architect of the Senate GOP's police reform bill, which has been fully endorsed by the White House.

What he's saying: "There's no question. He should not have retweeted it and he should just take it down," Scott said. "If you watch the entire video — you can't play it because it was so profanity laced. The entire thing was offensive. Certainly, the comment about the white power was offensive. There's no question."

  • "We can play politics with it or we can't. I'm not going to. I think it's indefensible, we should take it down. That's what I think."

Update: Trump appeared to have deleted the tweet around 11am ET Sunday, about three hours after posting it.

Go deeper: Video retweeted by Trump shows supporter yelling "white power"

Editor's note: This post has been updated to add that the tweet has since been deleted.

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Trump’s superpower turns to kryptonite

Screenshot from CNN

No president in our lifetime has enjoyed a more mesmerizing, seemingly unbendable hold on his political base than Donald Trump. He shifts their views on big topics like the FBI or Vladimir Putin and retains their support regardless of what he says or does.

Why it matters: This connection is turning fast into a liability for Trump and the entire GOP because the president and his mostly white, mostly male base are on the opposite side of most Americans on the epic topics of our day — wearing masks, combating the coronavirus, and condemning racial inequality and police brutality.

Competitors ready to pounce on TikTok bans

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Growing security and privacy concerns over Chinese-owned short-video app TikTok have given a lift to alternatives like Byte and Dubsmash, which have seen spikes in downloads from smartphone users recently, according to data from SensorTower.

Why it matters: If TikTok's meteoric rise in popularity among U.S. youth gets slowed by rising tensions with China, or ended by a threatened ban by the Trump administration, American teens will still have to get their hits of meme-laden video somewhere.

23 mins ago - Technology

U.S. pushes homegrown drone industry amid China battle

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Alarmed at the prospect of relying on Chinese-made drones for public safety and monitoring critical industries, U.S. investors and the federal government are newly backing a domestic drone industry of hardware and software companies.

The big picture: The moves come as the industry continues to be led by DJI, a Chinese hardware maker — and as concerns grow both in China and the U.S. about reliance on the other country's technology.