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Sen. Tim Scott (R-S.C.) told CBS News' "Face the Nation" on Sunday that ending qualified immunity for police officers is "off the table" for Republicans, and that "any poison pill in legislation means we get nothing done." 

Why it matters: Ending “qualified immunity,” a legal doctrine that makes it all but impossible to successfully sue police officers, is one of several policy proposals that has gained traction on the left.

  • Scott has been tasked with spearheading Senate Republicans' reform proposal. He told CBS' Margaret Brennan that his legislation will focus on increasing information sharing, reforming training and tactics to prioritize de-escalation, and changing how departments deal with officer misconduct.
  • Scott said he's interested in de-certification of officers who engage in misconduct, but said that police unions are opposed to that idea and it's unlikely to get support from the left.

What they're saying:

"From the Republican perspective and the president sent the signal that qualified immunity is off the table. They see that as a poison pill on our side. We could use a de-certification of officer, except for the law enforcement unions say that's a poison pill. So we're going to have to find a path that helps us reduce misconduct within the officers. But at the same time, we know that any poison pill in legislation means we get nothing done. That sends the wrong signal, perhaps the worst signal, right now in America. I think we're going to have legislation that can be negotiated, that gets us to the place where something becomes law that actually makes a difference. That's got to be our goal. 
— Sen. Tim Scott

The big picture: House Democrats have introduced a sweeping police reform package that includes proposals like banning chokeholds and no-knock warrants and removing qualified immunity for police officers.

  • The "Justice in Policing Act of 2020" aims to broaden police accountability by tracking "problematic" officers through a national misconduct registry for officers over actions in the field.

The other side: Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) later told "Face the Nation" that he's spoken to Sen. Mike Braun (R-Ind.) and that ending qualified immunity is still "on the table."

Go deeper: The policies that could help fix policing

Go deeper

McEnany says herd immunity has never been COVID strategy, despite Trump comments

Trump and George Stephanopoulos at an ABC town hall on Sept. 15. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany told reporters that "herd immunity has never been a strategy" for the Trump administration's response to the coronavirus, after the president claimed on Tuesday that the coronavirus would disappear when people develop "a herd mentality."

Why it matters: A state of herd immunity, in which widespread outbreaks are prevented because enough people in a community are immune to a disease, would likely cause mass death if not pursued by way of a vaccine. The magic number often cited for herd immunity is a minimum of 60% of the population.

Updated 17 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Here come Earmarks 2.0

DeLauro at a hearing in May 2020. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

The House Appropriations Committee is preparing to restore a limited version of earmarks, which give lawmakers power to direct spending to their districts to pay for special projects.

Why it matters: A series of scandals involving members in both parties prompted a moratorium on earmarks in 2011. But Democrats argue it's worth the risk to bring them back because earmarks would increase their leverage to pass critical legislation with a narrow majority, especially infrastructure and spending bills.

Ben Geman, author of Generate
49 mins ago - Energy & Environment

UN says Paris carbon-cutting plans fall far short

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Nations' formal emissions-cutting pledges are collectively way too weak to put the world on track to meet the Paris climate deal's temperature-limiting target, a United Nations tally shows.

Driving the news: This morning the UN released an analysis of the most recent nationally determined contributions (NDCs) — that is, countries' medium-term emissions targets submitted under the 2015 pact.