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Photo illustration: Mateusz Slodkowski/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images.

TikTok is expanding the ways parents can control how their children use the video-sharing app, according to a company blog post Tuesday.

The big picture: TikTok has sought to position itself as a fun and safe portal in the face of political headwinds over its Chinese ownership and as it watches more established peers wrestle with thorny content moderation challenges.

Driving the news: The new tools build on TikTok's "Family Pairing" feature, which allows parents to control how long their kids spend on the app and who can message them. The new features include parental controls over:

  • Whether or not teens can search for content.
  • Whether or not their accounts are private, or discoverable to any user.
  • Who can comment on their videos.

Flashback: TikTok this spring disabled direct messages for users under 16, and rolled out its Family Pairing tool.

  • The focus on beefed-up protections for underage users follows a 2019 fine from the Federal Trade Commission over allegations that TikTok predecessor app Musical.ly collected data from minors in violation of federal law.

Go deeper

Nov 17, 2020 - Economy & Business

Exclusive: Outbrain leaders launch newsletter curation app Listory

Listory

Listory, a newsletter curation app created within the content recommendation company Outbrain, is launching this week, executives tell Axios.

Why it matters: As the newsletter craze expands, it makes sense that entrepreneurs are looking for ways to help users streamline their inboxes.

Ina Fried, author of Login
Nov 18, 2020 - Technology

Apple to lower commissions for small businesses on App Store

Screenshot via Apple.com

Apple announced a new program Wednesday under which it will take a smaller 15% cut from App Store sales for businesses earning less than $1 million selling their apps, rather than the standard 30% cut.

Why it matters: Apple is under fire from some critics over its rigid App Store policies that require developers to use Apple payment systems for both app sales and in-app payments in exchange for a cut of sales.

Updated 4 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Key government agency says Biden transition can formally begin

General Services Administrator Emily Murphy. Photo: Alex Edelman/CNP/Getty Images

General Services Administrator Emily Murphy said in a letter to President-elect Joe Biden on Monday that she has determined the transition from the Trump administration can formally begin.

Why it matters: Murphy, a Trump appointee, had come under fire for delaying the so-called "ascertainment" and withholding the funds and information needed for the transition to begin while Trump's legal challenges played out.