Youtube / Jimmy Kimmel

An Obama White House alumnus told us last night that Jimmy Kimmel killed the Republicans' already shaky efforts to revive the House's health-care reform. (In prime time last night, CNN was running the banner: "LATEST GOP HEALTH CARE BILL ON VERGE OF COLLAPSE." The WashPost's lead story is "GOP health bill on shaky ground.")

The instant ubiquity of the late-night host tearfully discussing his baby Billy's open-heart surgery, along with a message decrying Trump's proposed cuts to the National Institutes of Health ("If your baby is going to die, ... it should not matter how much money you make"), is an eye-opening case study of the stunning velocity of the new media ecosystem.

So we decided to quantify the reach of the "Jimmy Kimmel Live" monologue, beyond the 7 million views on his official YouTube page.

Kimmel typically reaches roughly 2 million people per night on his show. You'll never believe what happened next ...

Social:On Facebook, Kimmel's monologue clip received over 14 million views and 230,000 reactions in less than 24 hours. His posts typically don't receive more than 1 million views.On Instagram, the video post of his monologue received 122,968 views and 20,022 likes. That's about double his average Instagram post engagement.His tweet of the video received over 26,000 retweets and 79,000 likes. His tweets don't typically earn more than a couple hundred retweets.Search:Interest in "Jimmy Kimmel" on Google Search rose rapidly through the morning and spiked at midday, along with searches for "cardiac surgery" and "open-heart surgery."Weighing in:Both President Obama and Hillary Clinton tweeted their support, as well as numerous celebrities.On Capitol Hill, Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-Texas), cited the speech on the House floor. Former Rep. Joe Walsh (R-Ill.), now a syndicated radio talk-show host, was ripped online after he tweeted: "Sorry Jimmy Kimmel: your sad story doesn't obligate me or anybody else to pay for somebody else's health care."

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Trump tightens screws on ByteDance to sell Tiktok

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

President Trump added more pressure Friday night on China-based TikTok parent ByteDance to exit the U.S., ordering it to divest all assets related to the U.S. operation of TikTok within 90 days.

Between the lines: The order means ByteDance must be wholly disentangled from TikTok in the U.S. by November. Trump had previously ordered TikTok banned if ByteDance hadn't struck a deal within 45 days. The new order likely means ByteDance has just another 45 days after that to fully close the deal, one White House source told Axios.

Updated 5 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9:30 p.m. ET: 21,056,850 — Total deaths: 762,293— Total recoveries: 13,100,902Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9:30 p.m ET: 5,306,215 — Total deaths: 168,334 — Total recoveries: 1,796,309 — Total tests: 65,676,624Map.
  3. Health: CDC: Survivors of COVID-19 have up to three months of immunity Fauci believes normalcy will return by "the end of 2021" with vaccine — The pandemic's toll on mental health — FDA releases first-ever list of medical supplies in shortage.
  4. States: California passes 600,000 confirmed coronavirus cases.
  5. Cities: Coronavirus pandemic dims NYC's annual 9/11 Tribute in Light.
  6. Business: How small businesses got stiffed — Unemployment starts moving in the right direction.
  7. Politics: Biden signals fall strategy with new ads.

Harris: "Women are going to be a priority" in Biden administration

Sen. Kamala Harris at an event in Wilmington, Del. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

In her first sit-down interview since being named Joe Biden's running mate, Sen. Kamala Harris talked about what she'll do to fight for women if elected VP, and how the Democrats are thinking about voter turnout strategies ahead of November.

What they're saying: "In a Biden-Harris administration women are going to be a priority, understanding that women have many priorities and all of them must be acknowledged," Harris told The 19th*'s Errin Haines-Whack.