Immigration

Less than a quarter of migrant children have been reunified as deadline looms

A protestor holding a sign that says "return the kids, end detention"
Photo: Don Emmert/AFP via Getty Images

The Department of Homeland Security and Department of Health and Human Services have reunited 364 migrant children to date who had been separated at the border due to the Trump administration's zero-tolerance policy, according to court documents filed Thursday evening.

The big picture: A federal court's deadline for reunifying all migrant kids in HHS's custody who were removed from their parents is next Thursday, July 26th. There are still more than 2,100 children who have not been reunited. 229 parents are currently unable to be reunified either because parents have waived reunification, are in criminal custody or have been deemed ineligible.

Trump administration allows Somali immigrants to keep special status

Somalian citizens after a double car bomb kills three people
Somalian citizens after a double car bomb kills three people. Photo: Sadak Mohamed/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

The Trump administration is allowing Somalian immigrants to keep their special immigration status that allows them to remain in the United States at least until the status is considered again in 2020, reports the AP.

The big picture: Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen said the armed conflict that has been going on in the country was the reason behind the decision not to remove special immigration status from Somali immigrants. However, the administration won't be accepting any more from the country. It has held a special designation since 1991.

Secretary Nielsen says she agrees with intel community "full stop"

Kirstjen Nielsen speaking at a podium.
Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, speaking at the Aspen Security Forum Thursday, said that while she hasn't "seen any evidence" that Russia targeted the U.S. election "to favor a particular political party," she agrees with the intelligence community's assessment "full stop."

Why it matters: The administration has vacillated on the the extent to which Russia interfered in the 2016 presidential election. The issue came to a head on Monday when President Trump refused to confront Russian President Vladimir Putin about Moscow's involvement during their joint press conference. The administration has since sought to clarify their position.