Artificial intelligence

This robot co-taught a course at West Point

Bina48, one of the worlds most advanced social robots. Photo courtesy of Bina48 Facebook page
Bina48, one of the worlds most advanced social robots. Photo courtesy of Bina48 Facebook page

Bina48, the first-ever robot to complete a college course, finished another mission today: It became the first robot to co-teach a university-level class.

Why it matters: The experiment at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point sought to determine if AI can "support a liberal education model," says William Barry, a West Point professor who has been using Bina48 to teach for years.

Scientists, too, are being automated

Illustration of robot holding a beaker
Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

New advances are taking automation to the highest end of human endeavors, offering scientists a shot at some of the most intractable problems that have confounded them — and along the way tipping a global balance to give upstarts like China a more level playing field in the lab.

What’s going on: A combination of artificial intelligence and nimble robots are allowing scientists to do more, and be faster, than they ever could with mere human hands and brains.